Sarasota Jack Crevelle

Sarasota Jack Crevelle Fishing

Jack crevelle are one of the many species available to anglers.  Sarasota jack crevelle are great fun!

Sarasota jack crevelle are the bar room brawlers of inshore saltwater fishing. They are mean. Jacks are nasty. They have broad shoulders and large forked tails. Jack crevelle pull extremely hard. They swim around in big schools which results in a competition factor. They are one of my favorite game fish!

Sarasota is a good environment for Jack crevelle to thrive in. We have a nice mixture of shallow flats, deeper flats, passes, and most importantly creeks and residential canals. Jacks cannot tolerate water that’s below 55° for very long. Back in 2010 we had a severe cold snap and jacks were one of the first fish to die.

Sarasota jack crevelle

Jack crevelle spend their winter in creeks, rivers, and residential canals. These areas are typically five or six degrees warmer than the exposed open grass flats. Small bait fish, primarily glass minnows, seek refuge in these areas as well. This results in jacks having a place that they can thrive during cold weather.

As it warms up, jacks move out of these areas and scatter out onto the nearby flats to feed. They will often be seen terrorizing bait fish on the surface. We call this “breaking fish”and it is one of the most exciting ways to catch Sarasota jack crevelle. Jacks will pen the helpless bait fish up against a seawall. From a distance, it looks like a boat wake crashing up against the wall. In reality, it is a school of feeding fish.

Sarasota jack crevelle locations

I probably catch more fish for clients on Sarasota fishing charters while drifting the deep grass flats than I do any other technique. Sarasota has many acres of submerge grass in water between five and 10 feet deep. These are very fertile waters as the grass houses shrimp, crabs, and bait fish such as pin fish and grunts.

The technique is quite simple. Anglers cast jigs, flies, or live baits out as the boat drifts over the flat with the wind and the tide. Jacks and other game fish tend to roam the flat in search of food. When anglers do fine fish, they generally come in bunches. This is especially true with jack crevelle, bluefish, and ladyfish. We don’t normally see jacks working the surface and this deeper water, but it does occur occasionally.

Jacks will also school up in both passes. Big Sarasota Pass and New Pass will both have concentrations of jacks in them at certain times. The rocky shoreline at the northwest corner of Siesta Key holds a ton of bait in the summer. This in turn attracts the jack crevelle. This is a good spot to target jacks in the summer time.

They will also be encountered in the middle of the passes as anglers drift for pompano, ladyfish, and other species. Vertically jigging is a very productive technique, especially in water deeper than 15 feet. Anglers drop a 1/4 ounce to 1/2 ounce jig down to the bottom. Then, as the boat drifts along the jig is bounced up and down. Each time it hits the bottom it kicks up a little puff of sand, which closely imitates the crab.

The best area to fish for Sarasota jack crevelle would be from Siesta Drive Bridge south to Blackburn Point. This area is a bit shallower with oyster bars, docks, holes, residential canals, and Phillippi Creek. Perhaps it is because it is a bit smaller of a body of water in the jacks are easier to see and locate, but this stretch of water produces more jack crevelle then does the area up north.

Sarasota jack crevelle tackle

Phillippi Creek is a very reliable spot for jacks in the winter, though they can be found there all year long as well. They can be anywhere in the Creek from the mouth all the way up to Bee Ridge Road. Casting and trolling Rapala plugs is a great way to find and catch jacks. Trolling is a great way to cover a lot of water and eliminate unproductive areas.  Other productive creeks include Bowlees Creek, Hudson Bayou, Whittaker Bayou, and the Grand Canal on Siesta Key.

Sarasota jack crevelle

Anglers can choose either medium spinning tackle or light bait casting tackle when targeting jacks. Most of the Sarasota jack crevelle are in the 2 to to 5 pound class. This makes spinning tackle a great choice. Also, often times the lures and baits used are fairly light. A medium spinning outfit spooled up with 20 pound braid is an excellent choice. More experienced anglers who like tossing heavier top water plugs may opt for a bait casting outfit.

The rig is fairly simple. I like to double about 3 feet of the running line using a Spider Hitch. Then, I attach a 30 inch piece of 30 pound test fluorocarbon leader using a Double Uni Knot. Jacks have small teeth, but we use the shock leader more because of their abrasive jaws and Gill plates. A lower or hook is and attached to the free end of the leader.

My personal favorite way to catch jacks is to do so casting plugs. I find it to be an enjoyable way to fish, and soda my clients. Using the trolling motor, I ease the boat down a shoreline that has fish holding structure. These would include docks, oyster bars, and mangrove shorelines with a little depth. It’s fun making a good cast and then the anticipation of a strike. When a Jack takes the plug, there is no mistaking it!

Sarasota jack crevelle lures

Sarasota jack crevelle

My favorite lure for this type of fishing is the #8 Rapala X-Rap slashbait. It is about 3 inches long and it very closely mimics the bait fish that we have here in the water. Those include finger mullet, scaled sardines, glass minnows, and even small pin fish. Olive is an excellent all round color. White works very well in clear water and gold is a better choice in darker or stained water.

Jigs and other soft plastic baits fool a lot of jack crevelle as well. As stated earlier, anglers casting jigs over the deep grass flats catch jacks, mostly by surprise. For the deeper grass flats a quarter ounce jig head with a 3 inch to 4 inch plastic body works best. Anglers targeting jacks and shallower water will do better to lighten up the jig head to 1/8 of an ounce.

Bass Assassin jigs are my preference when it comes to soft plastic baits. They produce an incredible array of colors and tail sizes and shapes. They also offer a nice selection of jig heads. When targeting Sarasota jack crevelle, I prefer their Pro elite jig head. It has a wide gap and a very strong hook. Keep in mind, anglers will also encounter snook and redfish in the same areas that they will find jack crevelle.

Catching jack crevelle on live bait

While I personally prefer using artificial lures when targeting jacks, live bait catches plenty of fish as well. In the cooler months, anglers casting live shrimp under docks in search of redfish and snook will catch their share of jacks. Likewise, a free line shrimp over the deep grass flats will catch jack crevelle.

There is one live bait technique that is incredibly effective for jacks. Live bait chumming is incredibly productive. It is something that we do in the summer time when bait fish are thick on the grass flats near the passes. Using our cast nets, we load up the live well with to inch bait fish. Once the well is full, it is time to go fishing.

Sarasota jack crevelle

The boat is anchored up current of a likely looking spot. This can be a dock, and oyster bar, a grass flat, or a mangrove shoreline. Several handfuls of live bait are tossed out behind the boat. If the jacks are around, it won’t take them long for them to find this free meal. Once the fish are boiling behind the boat, baited hooks are tossed out into the melee. Hookups are usually immediate. This is a great way for less experienced anglers to have the chance to catch a nice fish!

Jacks on the fly

Jack crevelle are an ideal target for fly anglers as well. The fact that jacks are often sight fished and are so aggressive makes them popular to fly fisherman. The take is savage and jacks put up an incredible fight on a fly rod! When fish are breaking up on the surface it is certainly a great fly fishing opportunity.

An 8wt fly rod with an intermediate sink tip line is a great all round choice for targeting Sarasota jack crevelle. Anglers can certainly get away with a 7wt outfit if they prefer. A 9wt would be better if the jacks are running large, in the 10 pound class. An 8 foot to 10 foot tapered leader with a 24 inch piece of 30 pound test fluorocarbon bite tippet finishes off the rig.

Fly selection when targeting jacks is very simple. When they are in a feeding frenzy, fly pattern rarely matter as long as the fly is a drastically larger than the bait that they are feeding on. If I had to pick one fly pattern to fish with all the time for jacks, it would be in all white Clouser Minnow tied on a #1 hook.

Sarasota jack crevelle techniques

The technique when fish are breaking a simple, cast to the edge of the school of breaking fish and strip as fast as you can. When the fish are worked up like this, they are easy to hook. When fish are not breaking on the surface, anglers blind cast the same spots as mentioned above for anglers using artificial lures. The fly is cast out, allowed to sink a few seconds, then retrieved back using 12 inch to 18 inch strips.

Anglers seeking a unique experience can choose a river fishing charter. I am one of the only guides in Sarasota that offers this to visiting anglers. There are several rivers that lie a half hour away from Sarasota and Bradenton. These can provide excellent fishing for jacks in the cooler months.

The Myakka River flows from Manatee County south into the north end of Charlotte Harbor. It is an excellent river for catching large snook. Jack Gravelle and several other species are found there as well. The best area for targeting jacks in the Myakka River is the portion around Tamiami Trail Bridge. This area seems to have the best salinity level for jacks.

Jacks in the Manatee River

While the Myakka River offers good fishing for jack crevelle, my first choice would be the Manatee River. This River is not quite as long as the Myakka River. This means that jacks tend to concentrate and it and easier to locate. The Manatee River flows into the south end of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay has an excellent population of jacks. They migrate up into the Manatee River and its tributaries in the wintertime

My clients catch the largest jack crevelle of the year fishing the Manatee River in the wintertime. It is hard to believe the fight that a 10 pound Jack and put up on light spinning gear or especially on a fly rod. The scenery is one of the attractions of the trip as well. It is peaceful and relaxing as much of the fishing is done in “no wake” zones. There is also the chance to catch snook, redfish, ladyfish, and even largemouth bass as well.

While jacks will be seen working on the surface, many more are caught by anglers blind casting. Sometimes boils and other activity will be seen, but most of the time it is just a matter of drifting the shoreline and casting lures or flies out. The random nature of the bite and it being unexpected certainly adds to the fun!

So, the next time you’re down this way and would like to tangle with one of the toughest fish in the sea, give Sarasota jack crevelle fishing a try! You won’t see them on the cover of any glamorous fishing magazine. They are bit too rough and unrefined for that. But tangle with them, and I think you’ll agree with me that they are one of the most exciting fish to catch! More information on jack crevelle can be found HERE.

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