Pompano Fishing, a complete guide

Pompano fishing, a Complete Guide

Pompano fishing is very popular among saltwater anglers. They are one of the most desirable species for anglers along the coast from Texas to the Carolinas. These smaller cousins to the permit are very beautiful fish that fight incredibly hard for their size and taste great. Pompano are found in the inshore waters and in the surf along the coast. They can be caught by anglers using several different techniques.

pompano fishing in Florida

Pompano, Trachinotus carolinus, have an inferior mouth. They root along the bottom in search of shrimp, crabs, and other crustaceans. Therefore, the best lures and baits are fished right on the bottom. Pompano are found along the entire coast of the southeast United States.They put up a terrific fight and are fantastic to eat!

Pompano can be taken on both live and artificial baits. In either case, the offering is presented right on the bottom where pompano feed. A moving bait or lure that bounces along the bottom is especially effective as it simulates fleeing prey.

Top live and artificial baits for pompano fishing are;

  • live shrimp
  • small pompano jigs
  • live or frozen sand fleas
  • banana jigs
  • jig and grub combo
  • fresh clam and oyster

Most pompano are caught by anglers surf fishing. Anglers catch them both off of the beaches and in the inshore bays.  Passes and inlets are prime spots to find pompano as well. Pompano may be encountered at any time of year. However, cooler months are generally the most productive times of year to catch pompano, though that does vary by region.

Florida pompano fishing

Pompano look very similar to juvenile permit. They also tend to live in the same environments. Permit have longer fins with a bit of black on the tips. If anglers have any doubt, it is best to err on the side of caution and release the fish.

Pompano Fishing with Jigs video

Best pompano fishing tackle

As in most inshore saltwater applications, the same rod and reel used to target speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, and other species will work fine when targeting pompano. A light spinning outfit works best since pompano average two pounds. A 7 foot medium action rod with a 2500-3000 series reel and 10 pound monofilament or braided line is perfect. Below is the rod and reel combo that Capt Jim uses on his fishing charters, a Penn Conflict rod and reel.

Fishing lIdo Key Products

Anglers can shop Amazon for Penn Conflict combo in this link.

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Best pompano fishing lures

When it comes to pompano fishing lures, the jig is the preferred bait by Capt Jim and many other anglers. Jigs realistically mimic the crabs and other crustaceans that pompano feed on. The best pompano fishing lures are jigs with round or conical heads and a short, thick skirt.  Banana jigs are odd looking baits that have a very erratic action as they fall. These are productive pompano fishing lures as well.

Sarasota pompano fishing

Click link to read a detailed article on the best pompano fishing lure!

Jigs produce most of the pompano landed by anglers choosing to fish with artificial lures. A close look at a pompano will reveal a small, inferior mouth. The term inferior mouth refers to the fact that the opening of the mouth is on the underside of the head. This will indicate the method by which a pompano feeds. It swims with it’s head down and tail up, searching  the bottom for crustaceans such as shrimp and crabs. When it comes to pompano fishing lures, the jig is the top bait.

pompano jig

Anglers can click this link to shop Amazon for pompano jigs

This explains why jigs are so productive when targeting pompano. A jig that is bounced off the bottom kicks up a tiny puff of sand. This very closely mimics the action of a fleeing crab or shrimp. Jigs produce on the beach, in the passes, and in the bays. Bright colors such as red, chartreuse, and white are the most productive.  Capt Jim uses them often on his Sarasota fishing charters.

Florida pompano fishing

Many anglers land pompano while casting 3 inch to 4 inch jigs while drifting over the deep grass flats. The Bass Assassin baits that work so well for speckled trout, bluefish, ladyfish, and other species will also fool pompano. The same jig and fall retrieve is productive. The deeper flats, those between 8 feet and 10 feet deep, produce more pompano. However, they can be encountered over sandbars in as little as 2 feet of water.

Click this link to shop Amazon for Bass Assassin Sea Shad baits

Small jigs are best for pompano fishing

While the larger jigs will catch the occasional pompano, when specifically targeting pompano, smaller lures are often used. Not surprisingly, these are called “pompano jigs”. As noted earlier, pompano have a quite small mouth, so a smaller bite-size jig works well. These jigs are very plain looking. There simply a round jig head with a little bit of dressing, usually synthetic care. Combinations of white, yellow, chartreuse, and red have proven to be effective colors.

jig fishing for pompano

There is another type of lure specifically designed to for anglers Florida pompano fishing. They are called “banana jigs”. They are long and slender, and shaped like a banana, thus the name. When jerked up sharply, they fall in a very erratic manner. Pompano find this action irresistible. Some also have a little fly or teaser near the hook. Often times pompano will be hooked under the chin with the second little teaser hook.

Click this link to shop Amazon for Banana style jigs

Pompano fishing techniques

Anglers drifting the deep grass flats simply cast the jig out ahead of the drifting boat, allow it to sink, and work it back in using short hops. The same technique works for those fishing for pompano off the beaches. When the bite is tough or when the water is a bit off-color, tipping the jig with a small piece of shrimp can really make a difference.

Florida pompano fishing

Anglers can purchase Capt Jim’s E-book, “Inshore Saltwater Fishing” for $5 by clicking on the title link. It is 23,000 words long and covers tackle, tactics, and species.

If there is one spot to fish for pompano from a boat, it would be passes and inlets. These areas have everything a pompano needs. There are often expansive bars at the mouths of passes on the Gulf coast, which will hold schools of pompano at times. Miles of rocky structure in inlets and passes hold the crustaceans that pompano feed on. Large areas of sand flats just inside passes and inlets in 10 to 12 feet of water have good current flow and also attract pompano.

top 8 Sarasota fish species

Jigging for Florida pompano in passes

Jigs work extremely well in the passes and inlets. For those who don’t know, a pass is basically an inlet. “Pass” is the term used on the Gulf Coast and “inlet” is used on the Atlantic Ocean side. As the current flows in and out of these fish highways, pompano will cruise the bottom in search of food. Pompano tend to school up in the passes. Once a productive area is located, that area should be drifted several times. Anglers can catch quite a few in a short period of time.

best Sarasota fishing charter

Pompano fishing with live bait

Many pompano are caught by anglers using live bait as well. Live shrimp are the most popular bait, mostly due to the convenience. They are readily available at every Florida bait shop. While live shrimp or fresh dead shrimp are best, pompano will certainly take a frozen shrimp as well.

There is another bait that’s very effective when targeting pompano, though using it is a bit more involved. These are called mole crabs, better known as sand fleas. Very few shops keep these live, though some do have frozen sand fleas available. Live sand fleas are much preferred to frozen baits. Anglers can purchase a special rake which they use in the surf line to catch the sand fleas. Obtaining sand fleas requires more effort, but many anglers swear by them.

sand flea

Surf fishing for pompano

One great thing about pompano fishing is that anglers without a boat catch more than their fair share. Surf fishing for pompano is very popular throughout their range. Pompano Beach is even named after this special fish! Surf fishing tactics vary a bit on each coast, so I will go into the difference and techniques.

The surf along the Gulf Coast is generally a bit more gentle than out of the Atlantic Ocean. Starting from the beach and moving out to sea, beaches will have several troughs and bars. Many times the pompano will be in the first trough, 10 to 15 feet from shore. This means that long casts are not required.

pompano fishing

West coast pompano surf fishing

The best approach for targeting pompano off of Gulf Coast beaches is to use fairly light spinning tackle, in the 10 pound class. Anglers can then choose to use a quarter ounce jig and cast and retrieve, or to fish with live bait. As stated above, putting a piece of fresh shrimp on a jig head can be the best of both worlds. As an added benefit, other species such as whiting, sheepshead, flounder, trout, ladyfish, and more will take a shrimp-tipped jig.

pompano

Anglers choosing to fish with live bait will do well by keeping it simple. A small #4 hook and a split shot or two will get the job done. By using as little weight as possible, anglers will achieve a very natural presentation. It is best if the shrimp is slowly moving along the bottom with the current.

Florida pompano fishing, East Coast

The surf on the East Coast of Florida in the Atlantic Ocean tends to be a bit rougher. Also, tide differences are more extreme. Lastly, anglers often have to cast into a stiff breeze. For these reasons, anglers surf fishing for pompano off of Atlantic Ocean beaches use the more traditional style tackle and rigs.

surf fishing

Surf rods are spinning rods that are 10 to 13 feet or even longer. They have large spinning reels with high-capacity spools. These long rods allow anglers to make a very long cast and keep the line up out of the crashing waves. After casting out, the rods are placed into sand spikes. These are simply pieces of PCV tubing that hold the rod upright.

Anglers can shop Amazon for surf fishing rod and reel combos here

Florida pompano surf fishing rigs and tackle

There are several rigs that can be used for this type of surf fishing. The most common rig used when targeting pompano is the “high low” rig. This is simply two different hooks spaced apart with one being close to the bottom and the other about a foot or so above. A heavy pyramid style weight is at the very bottom. It is not uncommon to catch two fish at a time when using this rig.

bottom fishing rigs

The other commonly used rig off of the surf is the fish finder rig. This is a device that has a clip to hold on the pyramid sinker with a hollow tube allowing the line to run freely through it. The biggest advantage of this rig is that fish can pick up the bait and move off with it without feeling the weight of the sinker. However, because the bait lies on the bottom it tends to attract more sharks and other undesirable species.

surf fishing rigs

Anglers surf fishing for pompano will also do well with standard surf fishing tackle. A 10 foot surf rod with matching reel will do fine in most situations. Experienced anglers will often step up to a 13 foot rod when the surf is high. This allows them to cast further and get the line up above the breaking waves.

Baits for catching pompano in the surf

Shrimp and sand fleas are two most popular baits for surf anglers targeting pompano.  Shrimp have an advantage in that they will catch many other species.  Hard core pompano anglers do not want these other species and will opt for sand fleas.  They are a bit more of a specialized bait.  In some areas, clams and mussels are also used. Commercially made baits are very popular and effective while also being quite convenient. Fish Bites and Fishgum are two examples.

surf fishing for pompano

The fishing technique with both rigs is basically the same and quite simple. The hooks are baited up, and the rig is cast out as far as possible. Once the bait settles, the rod is placed in the sense bite with the line taught. Once the rod tip indicates that a fish is biting the rod is removed from the spike in the hook is set. Click this link for current Florida pompano fishing regulations.

Fly fishing for Pompano

Pompano can be caught by anglers fly fishing as well. The primary challenge when fly fishing for pompano is getting the fly down deep enough. There are a couple of techniques that will help fly anglers be more successful.

pompano on fly

The same 7wt to 9wt fly fishing outfits that anglers use for trout, mackerel, and other species will be fine when chasing pompano. Sinking lines are required to get the fly down close to the bottom. In fairly shallow water, an intermediate sink tip line will work well. In deeper water, a full sinking line is best.

Another tip is to shorten up the leader, this will keep the fly closer to the bottom where pompano feed. A 6′ piece of 20 lb flourocarbon leader will get the job done. Any fly that mimics a shrimp or crab will produce. Weighted flies are usually better. A #2 Clouser is a good all round fly choice. Olive/white, pink/white, chartreuse/white, and brown/white are good color combinations.

fly fishing Sarasota Bay

Just as with jigs, the fly is cast out, allowed to settle, then retrieved back in using short, firm strips. Most strikes will occur as the fly falls back down. Anglers do well fly fishing for pompano all along the Gulf Coast.

Top pompano fishing spots in Florida

While pompano can be caught throughout the state, there are a few areas that produce excellent numbers of pompano for anglers, particularly for those surf fishing. Here are a few of the top pompano spots in the Sunshine State.

Sarasota fishing report

Destin and Ft Walton Beach

The Destin area is a terrific spot to fish for a variety of saltwater species. Many miles of pristine beaches offer excellent opportunities for anglers who prefer to surf fish for pompano. There are several piers to fish from as well. Inshore bays are perfect for drifting and casting jigs for anglers who have a boat.

South Florida

The southeast coast of Florida is another terrific spot for pompano fishing. This is a terrific fishery in the cooler months. Northwest winds from cold fronts will have the surf calm on the east coast. Access is not as good as other areas, but there are plenty of beaches and piers for anglers to fish.

Top Florida saltwater game fish

Tampa Bay and Sarasota Bay

Tampa Bay and Sarasota Bay to the south lie on the west coast of Florida in about the middle on the peninsula. Both offer backwater fishing in the bays, pompano fishing in passes, as well as beach and pier fishing. The Sunshine Skyway Pier is the longest in the state and provides easy access to Tampa Bay. Cooler months are best but there are usually a few fish around all season.

Space Coast and Jacksonville

surf fishing

The beaches, inlets, and piers in northeast Florida also offer anglers decent pompano fishing. It is not as predictable as other areas as fish seem to move through. Anglers should keep an eye on local reports then hit the beach when the bite is on.

Pompano are excellent table fare

One of the best aspects of fishing for pompano is the opportunity for a fresh dinner. Some of the best chefs in the world consider Pompano to be the best eating fish of all species that swim! Pompano have a very fine, moist, buttery flavor. However, they really do not freeze all that well and angler should only keep enough for a fresh meal or two. There are several different ways to prepare them.

Pompano are excellent when sautéed in a pan. A 50-50 mixture of butter and olive oil is heated in a pan. Pompano is covered in a tire breadcrumbs on both sides then placed into the hot skillet. The fishes allowed to cook for two minutes on each side and then is finished off in a 400° oven for five minutes or so depending on the thickness of the fillets.

Marinades work very well with Pompano as they absorb the flavor. However, it is best not to use one that is too strong that will mass the delicate flavor of the pompano. An easy marinade is one that is 1/4 cup light soy sauce, three-quarter cup olive oil, with some honey, ginger, and parsley mixed in. The fillets are allowed to set for 1 to 2 hours they can be baked, broiled, or grilled.

Pompano recipes

While Pompano are great fun to catch, anglers prize them for their incredible table fare. I am a proponent of catch and release, however I don’t mind if clients keep a fish or two for dinner, and these are really a treat.  Pompano are one fish that I usually cook with the skin on.  It peels right off after cooking.

Pompano are delicious with a very delicate white flesh. The meat has a kind of “buttery” flavor with a unique texture. They are a tad bit oily but in a good way. This means that they are best baked, broiled, or grilled. Pompano do not freeze all that well.  Keep a couple for dinner and release the rest to please other anglers!

Baked Pompano; this is a very simple way to prepare Pompano. The oven is heated to 400°. The fillets are laid on a greased sheet pan and covered with a tire breadcrumbs. They are then bake for 8 to 10 minutes and can be served with a sauce such as lemon dill or teriyaki. This is very simple and the fish are delicious!

More pompano recipes

Broiled Pompano; broiling is another simple and easy way to enjoy Pompano. I like to prepare a marinade that consists of olive oil, light soy sauce, ginger, and honey or sugar. This gives it that Oriental sweet and sour flavor. The fillet should be marinated for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. The fillets are then put on a sheet pan and broiled under high heat 5 inches away from the heat for 6 to 8 minutes.

Grilled Pompano; Pompano are fantastic when grilled as well. I do like to keep the skin on when grilling Pompano. The fillets are seasoned to taste with a homemade or prepared grilling seasoning. Some olive oil or melted butter can be drizzled over top. The fillet is then put on a grill pan and grilled for eight minutes or so. As with the baked Pompano, a sauce can be served on the side.

In conclusion, this complete guide to pompano fishing will help anglers catch more of these hard-fighting and delicious fish!

 

 

Sarasota Sheepshead fishing

Sarasota Sheepshead Fishing

Sarasota sheepshead fishing is fun for all anglers.  They are a great fish for anglers of all ages and experience levels. They are widely distributed along the Gulf Coast and up the East Coast to New York. Sheepshead put up a great battle and are fine table fair.

Sheepshead are a member of the porgy family.  They arrive in the Sarasota area around Christmas and stay until early April.  The sheepshead run peaks in February and March.  Sheepshead are bottom feeders and are taken almost exclusively by anglers using live, fresh dead, or frozen bait.  Live shrimp are the most popular bait.  They spawn around structure such as submerged rocks, docks, bridges, and oyster bars.

sheepshead fishing

Read current Sarasota fishing report

Many of my northern clients confuse our Sheepshead with their “sheephead”. It is an entirely different species. The northern sheephead is considered a trash fish with no real food value. Our Sheepshead, while difficult to clean, is fantastic eating. Sheepshead also put up a great fight, using their wide bodies to pull hard against the bent rod. Imagine a bluegill on steroids and you have a sheepshead.

Sarasota sheepshead fishing tackle and baits

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

Most anglers targeting sheepshead using spinning tackle. Conventional tackle can be used, especially when fishing vertically. Many anglers fishing in the Gulf of Mexico prefer conventional tackle. Spinning tackle is certainly more popular for inshore anglers. It allows them to present baits both vertically and also to cast the bait towards some likely structure.

A 7 foot spinning rod with either 12 pound monofilament or 20 pound braided line is ideal. A 30 inch piece of 30 pounds fluorocarbon leader is tied onto the running line. Anglers can attach the leader using a line to line not such as the double Uni-knot or a number 10 black swivel. A #1 live bait hook or #3/0 circle hook completes the rig.  Anglers fishing the inshore Gulf of Mexico are required by law to use circle hooks.  The reason for this is than invariably other reef fish such as grouper and snapper will be caught.  Circle hooks allow for a healthy release.

sheepshead fishing

Sliding egg sinkers are used to keep the bait on the bottom. The general rule of thumb is to use the lightest sinker possible to get down and hold the bottom. The sinker can be slid onto the running line ahead of a swivel.  Then the leader is attached to the other end of the swivel. The leader can be attached without a swivel.  The sinker is then allowed to ride on the eye of the hook. This is what we term a “knocker rig”. Both allow the sheepshead to pick the bait up and move off without feeling the resistance of the weight.

Dedicated, experienced sheepshead anglers have their favorite secret bait. Sand fleas, oyster crabs, fiddler crabs, and others are well kept secrets. Many anglers consider fiddler crabs in particular the top sheepshead bait. They are an effective bait and are relatively easy to collect. But the reality is that shrimp catch plenty of sheepshead. I use live or frozen shrimp whenever I target sheepshead on my Sarasota fishing charters. They are easily obtained and are very effective

Sarasota sheepshead fishing structure

sheepshead fishing

Sheepshead will almost always be found near some type of structure. Here in Sarasota, we began our sheepshead hunt near the passes. Both big Sarasota pass and New Pass have deep water, good current flow, and plenty of structure. This makes for ideal sheepshead habitat for anglers Sarasota bottom fishing.

The best time to fish the passes is during times of slower moderate current flow. It is just too difficult to fish when the tide is running hard. Anchoring is difficult and a lot of weight is required to keep the shrimp on the bottom. During these times of high current flow, docks and 6 to 10 feet of water that are near the passes can be very productive spots.

Sarasota sheepshead fishing techniques

Anglers fishing the passes can choose to either anchor or drift. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. Drifting is a great approach when tides are slack. It allows anglers to cover some water without drifting to quickly over the fish. Snags are more of an issue from a drifting boat on a Sarasota fishing charter.

sheepshead fishing

I anchor most of the time when sheepshead fishing. The boat stays exactly where I wanted to, and once the bite gets going the fishing can be fast and furious. Structure in 8 to 20 feet of water hold most of the sheepshead. Other species such as gag grouper, mangrove snapper, gray snapper, pompano, and flounder will also be taken.

Sheepshead are notorious for their ability to take bait off a hook without being caught. They are world class bait thieves! One mistake many anglers make when sheepshead fishing is trying to “set the hook” when a bite is felt. This really applies to all fishing with live or cut bait.

Here is the technique that I teach my clients when sheepshead fishing on my charters. When sheepshead take a bait, anglers will usually feel a “tap” or series of “taps”. It is crucial that the bait be kept perfectly still while this occurs. Eventually, the angler will feel a steady pull while the rod tip bends. The angler should reel quickly, taking up the slack, then slowly raise the rod tip. This will result in a much higher hook-up ratio. If the fish is missed (which will happen many times) the hook is re-baited and cast back out.

Sarasota sheepshead fishing docks and canals

Sarasota is fairly developed. This means a myriad of residential canals, all of which have plenty of docks. Docks are great places to target sheepshead from December through March. As previously mentioned, docks in 6 to 10 feet of water with a little current flow are perfect. The best technique is to anchor a cast away up current of the dock. Anglers then pitched baited hooks towards the pilings.

Sarasota sheepshead fishing

Often times we are faced with windy conditions during this time of year. Docks and canals along Siesta Key and Lido Key offer protection from the wind, giving anglers on Sarasota fishing charters the chance to enjoy a productive day when they may perhaps be forced to stay home otherwise. Black drum, redfish, flounder, snook, and other species will take a shrimp meant for sheepshead.

Oyster bars can be an overlooked sheepshead hot spot. The best bars are those that are just covered up on high tide and drop off into four or 5 feet of water. Sheepshead will cruise the edges of the bars in search of oyster crabs and other crustaceans. A hook with just a light split shot will get the job done.

Sheepshead fishing in the Gulf of Mexico

There are several artificial reefs just off the Lido Key beaches. These reefs consist of concrete rubble and the remains of bridges and other structure. They lie in 30 feet of water to miles offshore. When the seas are calm, they can be terrific spots to target sheepshead. I will often times catch my largest fish of the year in these locations. All three inshore reefs hold fish, but all are different. 

The Roehr Reef is the smallest and the closest to shore. It holds sheepshead as well as other bottom fish.  Only three or four boat can fish it at once.  The Fisher Reef has some very good structure and is a bit further out, right off of New Pass.  Several boats can fish there at once.  The Silvertooth Reef has a ton of structure scattered out over a large area.  It is very good for sheepshead along with bottom fish and mackerel.

Natural ledges in the same areas will also hold sheepshead along with mangrove snapper and gag grouper. These ledges are small and difficult to locate, but once found can be highly productive. Most anglers don’t take the time to find a spots, so they get less fishing pressure than do the artificial reefs.The best way to locate these ledges is to key a sharp eye on the bottom machine while trolling. Most anglers do some trolling for king mackerel or Spanish mackerel at one time or another.  This is a great way to find good bottom fishing spots.

Sheepshead fishing top spots in Sarasota

The Rocky structure at the north end of Siesta Key is a fantastic Sheepshead spot in the winter and early spring. Deep water, plenty of structure, and good current flow attract and hold the fish.

Docks along bird key in the northeast part of Siesta Key are proven Sheepshead spots. They are a great option when title flow and the passes is too strong. Also, no matter how stiff the breeze, there is usually a protected side to fish.

Docks and rocks and New Pass are productive as well. New Pass is also a bit more protected from the weather. The new pass bridge is a fish magnet, holding sheepshead and just about every other bottom fish species. Bait is easily obtained at the New Pass bait shop near the bridge.

The Ringling Bridge pilings hold plenty of sheepshead as well. The bridges and 10 to 12 feet of water and has plenty of structure for sheepshead and snapper. Drifting near the pilings with the bait as close as possible is a great technique. The New Pass Bridge, Siesta Drive Bridge, and Stickney Point Bridge all hold fish as well.

Docks in Roberts Bay south of the Siesta Drive bridge hold plenty of sheepshead and black drum. They are great spots to fish when it is blowing hard, offering protection from the open Bay.

The channel edges in the no wake zone in the Intracoastal Waterway between the mouth of Phillippi Creek and the Stickney Point Bridge are another good spots of fish on breezy days.

Artificial reefs off of the Lido Key beaches are easy accessed on a nice day and hold a lot of sheepshead in the cooler months. Anglers can get a list of the reefs and coordinates HERE.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Sarasota Mangrove Snapper Fishing

Sarasota Mangrove Snapper Fishing

Anglers Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing experience action, tough battles on light tackle, and terrific eating! Mangrove snapper please anglers of all ages and skill levels on the inshore waters of Florida and beyond.

Mangrove snapper are abundant and widely distributed throughout the southern United States and the Caribbean. Snappers school up in large numbers and usually associate with structure of some sort. Many anglers bottom fish for mangrove snapper offshore. However, they are plentiful inshore as well, and are often the target of anglers seeking a meal. Anglers who would like to discuss a fishing charter can contact me at (941) 371-1390 or captklopfer@comcast.net

Sarasaota mangrove snapper fishing

Read current Sarasota fishing report

Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing: Tackle and baits

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

As a full time fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida, it is my job to meet my clients expectations. Sarasota is a tourist destination and I get a lot of casual anglers. Mangrove snapper are the perfect fish for these anglers. They are quite aggressive at times, school up in good numbers, pull hard, and taste great. They are basically “saltwater panfish” with white, tasty flesh.

 
Light spinning tackle is the best choice for anglers targeting mangrove snapper in shallow, inshore waters. A 7 foot rod with ten pound monofilament or 20 pound braided line works well. Snapper can be fussy and bite very lightly at times. Light tackle increases sensitivity, resulting in more hook-ups. If large grouper or snook are also an option, slightly heavier tackle may be in order.

With snapper fishing, “less is more”. The lighter the rig, the more success anglers will have. Mangrove snapper have keen eyesight and can be finicky. A small hook will draw more strikes. In most instances, a #1 live bait hook or a #3/0 circle hook is perfect. Circle hooks are required when fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. Anglers should use the minimum weight required to get the bait down. A light leader should be used as well. A 24” piece of flourocarbon leader is a good choice.

Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing

I live to use a “knocker rig”. This lets the sinker ride right up against the eye of the hook. This allows a snapper to pick the bait up without feeling any weight while keeping the bait right on the bottom. The sliding sinker with “knock” the hook off of most snaps, thus the name. ¼ ounce sinkers work fine in most circumstances. Strong currents may require more weight.

Most anglers go mangrove snapper fishing inshore using live or frozen bait. While snapper will take artificial lures, live bait is best in most applications. The number one bait in Florida is shrimp. Live shrimp is preferred, but plenty of snapper have fallen prey to frozen shrimp. Shrimp is available at every bait shop in Florida and the south east United States.

Live baitfish can be a very effective bait as well, particularly for anglers seeking larger fish. A 2” live pinfish or grunt will not get as many bites, but the fish will be larger. Small bait fish such as pilchards (scaled sardines), threadfin herring, and Spanish sardines are also very good baits. The same bait fish will produce presented as cut bait. Mullet and squid are both good frozen baits that can be cut into chunks or strips and fished effectively on the bottom.

Sarasota fishing charters

In most instances, anglers will have success mangrove snapper fishing inshore by targeting some type of structure. Bridges, docks, and seawalls are all prime examples of man made structure. Oyster bars, natural ledges, and grass flat edges are all examples of natural structure. All will hold mangrove snapper at times. Bait fish presence and tidal flow are factors as well.

Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing

Passes and inlets are prime snapper fishing spots. The water is usually deeper than the flats. Also, current flow is usually present. Structure such as docks and rip rap in passes and inlets will hold snapper and other species all year long. Current can actually be too strong at times. This is particularly true on the east coast where tides are stronger. Slack tides can be the best option.

Bridges are mangrove snapper magnets! Bridges are generally in water around ten feet deep, which is perfect. They are also normally in narrow spots, which results in good tidal flow. Some bridges are also in “No Wake Zones”, resulting in less waking by passing vessels. Bridges also offer access for anglers without a boat to fish for mangrove snapper.

Oyster bars are terrific spots to locate and catch mangrove snapper. Prime bars have a steep drop off into water that is several feet deep or more. High tide just starting to fall is the best time to fish oyster bars.

Grass flats that drop off sharply are rime snapper spots as well. Here in Sarasota where I fish, there are areas that have been dredged to make fill. This resulted in shallow flats that drop off into 15 feet of water. Mangrove snapper will congregate on these edges. In the Florida Keys, there are “banks” that hold a lot of mangrove snapper. These are basically “humps” with grass that pop up in the open bays.

Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing techniques

Anglers fishing for mangrove snapper with live or frozen bait will almost always anchor either up-current of the spot to be fished or directly over the top of it. In water ten feet deep or shallower, it is usually best to anchor a cast away from the structure. In water deeper than ten feet, vertically fishing can be the most effective presentation.

Sarasota fishing calendar

Anchoring is a skill in itself. Wind and tide must be taken into consideration when anchoring. The worst thing an angler can do it to drag the anchor through the fishing spot. This will certainly ruin the spot. Only practice and experience will give anglers the skill they need to anchor up on a spot properly.

Once the boat is anchored, it is time to fish. Live shrimp can be hooked in several ways. The shrimp can be hooked under the horn. This allows for a natural presentation, but also makes it easier for the snapper to take the shrimp off of the hook. Shrimp can be threaded on the hook as well. This works well, even though it kills the shrimp. The fresh juices will permeate the water and attract snapper to the bait.

Frozen shrimp and cut bait are fished in exactly the same manner. Frozen shrimp should be threaded onto the hook. Live baitfish work best when hooked through the lips, especially if current is present. Fish can be cut into small chunks or strips. Both methods are effective. Squid work best when cut into long strips.

Hooking snapper

One mistake many anglers make when mangrove snapper fishing inshore is trying to “set the hook”. Once the bait settles on the bottom, anglers will initially feel a “tap”. There may be several “taps”. It is crucial that the angler remain still and not move the bait at all. At some point the snapper will take the bait. The angler will see the rod tip bend steadily. The angler should simply reel quickly, removing the slack while the rod tip is raised up. If the snapper steals the bait, re-bait and try again!

Sarasota mangrove snapper fishing

 

Here in Sarasota, we have experienced a very productive summer snapper bite. For whatever reason, schools of snapper showed up on the deep grass flats once the bait fish showed up on the flats. Chumming over grass flats in 6 feet to 10 feet of water brought schools of snapper up behind the boat and in an aggressive mood.

Chumming is widely practiced when fishing for snapper offshore. Inshore it can be used, but it must be done judiciously. Chumming in strong tides will have the opposite effect, it will disperse the snapper instead of attracting them to the boat. One technique that is deadly is to use live bait to chum on the deep grass flats. Currents are not as strong on the open flats. This requires a lot of bait, but bait fish are usually abundant in the summer and easily caught.

Inshore Gulf of Mexico

Sarasota has an extensive artificial reef program. Several of these reefs are within a couple miles of the beach. They hold mangrove snapper and other bottom fish. These reefs consist of concrete rubble, bridge remains, and other fish-holding structure. The three nearshore reefs are in thirty feet of water. The best approach is to anchor and fish vertically. However, when the wind and current are both light, anglers can drift the reef. Snags will become more prevalent. The reef coordinates can be found HERE.

Most of the inshore Gulf of Mexico bottom consists of sand. There are some ledges and rocky outcroppings. These are fish magnets! Small ledges that get little fishing pressure can produce for many years if fished judiciously. Once a good ledge is found, anglers should search nearby, there are usually more spots in the neighborhood.

Mangrove snapper fishing with lures

While live bait works best, mangrove snapper will hit artificial lures. Most of the snapper that my clients catch on lures are done so while targeting other species. I use a #8 Rapala X-Rap when fishing for snook and other species. Since snapper share the same spots, they will be caught as well. The small plug closely resembles the small finger mullet and other bait fish that inhabit the inshore bays.

Jigs will also fool mangrove snapper, especially on the deep grass flats. Scented soft plastic baits can be particularly effective. My personal favorite is the 3” Gulp! Shrimp and the color really does not matter.

Mangrove snapper recipes

While I very much promote catch and release, I do not mind if clients keep a few tasty snapper for a meal. This is especially true with our resident species. These snapper are migrating out of the bays and into the open Gulf of Mexico. Snapper are delicious and can be prepared many ways. Here are a few of my favorites. They are all simple and very easy.  Florida snapper regulations are found here.

BLACKENED SNAPPER

A skillet is warmed up to a pretty good temperature. Snapper fillets are dipped in melted butter or olive oil and seasoned to taste with blackening seasoning. The fillets are then cooked for 3 minutes or so on each side.

FRIED SNAPPER

Fish have been fried for a long time! Fillets are covered in a commercial or home made coating and then fried in 350 degree oil.

BAKED SNAPPER

Snapper are placed on a baking sheet and covered with Italian bread crumbs and placed into a 400 degree oven for 8-10 minutes.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Sarasota Spanish Mackerel Fishing

Anglers very much enjoy Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing! Spanish mackerel are aggressive, fight very hard, are one of the fastest fish in the sea, and taste great when eaten fresh. What more could an angler ask for?  It is one of the favorite species of clients on my Sarasota fishing charters.

Atlantic Spanish mackerel is the species that Sarasota, Florida anglers will catch.  They migrate up the east coast as far as Cape Cod.  They will cover the entire Gulf Coast.  Anglers catch Spanish mackerel using a wide variety of baits and techniques.  These will be covered in this article on Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Read current Sarasota fishing report

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing: Tackle

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

Spanish mackerel average 2 to 5 pounds in Florida. Therefore, spinning tackle is usually the best choice when pursuing them. The lures and live baits often used when fishing for mackerel can be quite light. Long cast can be required at times as well. While conventional tackle can be used, especially when trolling, spinning tackle works best in most applications.

The same inshore spinning outfits that most anglers use for snook, redfish, and speckled trout will work well when targeting Spanish mackerel. A 6 1/2 foot to 7 foot fast action rod combined with a 3000 series spinning reel is a great all around combo. I prefer monofilament line when targeting Spanish mackerel. I feel that the stretch in the line can actually be beneficial as these fish are so fast and pull so hard.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Some type of leader will be required when fishing for Spanish mackerel. They have very sharp teeth, and cutoffs will occur. While steel leaders will reduce or eliminate cutoffs, they will also reduce strikes. This is especially true in a clear water that Spanish mackerel prefer. A good compromise is to use a 30 inch piece of 30 pound to 40 pound fluorocarbon leader.

Anglers seeking to catch Spanish mackerel on fly can easily do so.  A 7wt outfit works well.  Both floating and intermediate sink tip lines will be fine.  Spanish mackerel are easy to catch when they are working up on the surface.  A white D.T. Special fly tied on a long shank hook is effective and will reduce cut-offs.

Baits and lures for Spanish mackerel

Both artificial lures and live baits are extremely effective when Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing. Both have their advantages, depending on conditions. Anglers casting lures can cover a lot of water quickly and also elicit savage strikes from the aggressive mackerel. Live bait is usually a better choice when anchored over structure or when chumming fish behind the boat.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Spoons, jigs, and plugs are all effective lures for Spanish mackerel. Silver spoons can be cast a long way and mimic the bait fish that mackerel are usually feeding on. A quarter ounce jig head with a 3 inch Shad tail grub also works well. The grub tail is easily replaced when torn up by the toothy Spanish mackerel. Plugs are also very effective, though a bit more costly. Anglers need to be prepared to lose some lures, it is just part of fishing for Spanish mackerel.

Anglers can read more about the best Spanish mackerel fishing lures in this link.

Live bait certainly accounts for many Spanish mackerel being caught. Live shrimp is probably the number one live bait, as it is available at bait shops year-round. Small live bait fish such as pilchards, threadfin herring, and sardines can be extremely productive baits. Cut bait will catch plenty of mackerel as well, especially if it is fresh.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing: Techniques

Spanish mackerel require a high level of salinity. Therefore, they are found in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and inshore waters close to inlets and passes. Inshore bays, passes and inlets, in the inshore waters of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean are the prime areas to target Spanish mackerel.  They are often targets on a Sarasota fishing charter.

Inshore Spanish mackerel fishing

The most effective technique when targeting Spanish mackerel in the inshore bays is to drift over grass flats and 6 feet to 10 feet of water. Anglers can cast artificial lures such as spoons, jigs, and plugs as they drift along with the tide and wind. The best approach is to cast with the wind ahead of the drifting boat. Mackerel prefer a fast, aggressive retrieve. Fish can often times be seen working on the surface. Bird activity is another good sign that Spanish mackerel are present.

Anglers can also drift a live bait behind the boat when drifting the inshore flats. A # 1/0 long shank hook works well and will help reduce cutoffs. A live shrimp or bait fish is simply hooked in the front then cast out behind the boat and allowed to drift naturally. If the current or wind is strong, a small split shot may be required to get the bait down in the water column.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Chumming is also a very effective technique on the inshore flats. Both frozen chum and live chum can be used to draw mackerel up behind the boat. The technique is fairly simple; the boat is anchored up current of a likely flat or spot and chum is added into the water. Blocks of frozen chum can be purchased at most bait shops and work well. Chumming with live bait fish is more complicated but is a deadly technique. Once the fish are actively feeding behind the boat, they will hit both live and artificial baits.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing: Passes

On the East Coast of Florida the term inlet is used while on the Gulf Coast we call them passes. They are essentially the same thing, a narrow channel that connects the inshore bays to the open Gulf or ocean. They are both prime spots to target Spanish mackerel. Fish use passes and inlets as highways to migrate in and out of the bays and into the open waters of the Gulf and ocean.

Anglers can target Spanish mackerel in passes and inlets using several different techniques. Drifting with the current is very productive. The boat is idled up current of the area to be finished, then the current moves the boat over the targeted spot. Artificial lures work very well in this application, particularly spoons and jigs. These lures are heavy and will sink down in the current. Plugs will work well when fish are seen actively feeding on the surface.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Spanish mackerel may be found anywhere in a pass or inlet, but there are a few areas that will consistently hold fish. The mouth of the inlet or pass can be very productive on the last couple hours of the falling tide. Shallow bars that drop off into deep water can produce at any time. Structure such as rip-rap and docks will also hold fish.

Many inlets and passes have long rock jetties on either side. These are terrific spots for anglers without a boat to catch Spanish mackerel. In the spring and the fall when bait is plentiful, mackerel will usually be thick in these areas. When the run is on, it is mayhem! Artificial lures are tough to beat in this situation, as at times longer cast will need to be made. A half ounce silver spoon is tough to beat.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing: The beach

Many Spanish mackerel are caught in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico within a couple miles of shore. Spanish mackerel are generally caught reasonably shallow, in water around 30 feet deep. Often times, fish can be seen feeding voraciously on the surface. This is one of my favorite forms of fishing! It is great fun casting a lure into a fish feeding frenzy, knowing that you’re going to get a strike. False albacore and other species can be an added bonus.

While mackerel can be encountered in open water almost anywhere, structure in hard bottom areas will attract bait. This will in turn attract the Spanish mackerel and other game fish. Artificial reefs and water between 20 feet deep and 50 feet deep are prime spots. Here in Sarasota where I guided fish, we have several artificial reefs just a couple miles off the beach. These are very reliable spots to target Spanish mackerel.

Hard bottom areas in the same depths will also concentrate Spanish mackerel. The same ledges that you fish for grunts, sheepshead, grouper, and snapper will hold bait and attract mackerel. Since the spots are generally fairly small, anchoring is often the best approach. Anglers should anchor just up current from the break and free line baits back behind the boat. Live or frozen chum should get the bite going quickly.

Trolling for Spanish mackerel

Trolling is an incredibly effective technique and will put a lot of Spanish mackerel and the boat in a short amount of time. Trolling has several advantages when targeting Spanish mackerel. Anglers can cover a lot of water in a short period of time when trolling. This can be particularly important on days with a little chopped on the surface or when fish aren’t showing on top. Once a school of fish is located, trolling can produce a lot a fish in short order. Finally, trolling is really quite easy to do.

Trolling is simply driving the boat around 5 to 7 knots while dragging lures behind. But, as in all fishing, there are nuances and techniques that will improve the success rate. Spanish mackerel prefer lures that are moving at a brisk pace. This means that we have to get the lures down in the water column while still moving along fairly quickly. There are several different ways to accomplish this.

The easiest way to get the lure down to the fish is to use a plug with a diving lip on it. These lures float on the surface and as the boat begins to move they dive down to a certain depth. The depth that they dive is determined by the size and shape of the bill. In most cases, a lure that dive down 5 to 7 feet is ideal.

Trolling equipment

Trolling sinkers are another tool that allow anglers to troll for mackerel at the correct speed while getting the bait down to the fish. Sinkers for trolling come in two different styles, torpedo and keel designed weights. I prefer the keel weights. The sinker is tied onto the end of the running line and then a 6 foot to 10 foot piece of leader is attached to the other end. The angler can then use a spoon, plug, or jig on the terminal end.

Planers are the third method by which anglers can get their Lors down to the fish. While they do work very well, planers are a bit more complicated. Planers come in several sizes. A number one planer will dive down 5 to 7 feet and a number two planar will dive down to 15 feet or so. A long leader, usually around 20 feet, is attached to the end of the planar and then the lure.

Planers have a sliding ring on them which allows the planar to dive down deep when trolled but then trip when a fish strikes. This allows the angler to fight the fish without the added drag of the planar once the planar is reeled up to within a foot of the rod tip, the fish must be hand lined in the last 20 feet. This can be cumbersome but can be extremely effective when the mackerel are down deeper in the water column. It will also produce king mackerel.

Several manufacturers produce spoon specifically designed for trolling. The spoons are designed to have a tight wobble at quite high speeds and are extremely effective. They come in multiple sizes, allowing anglers to match the spoon to the size of the bait and the water. They have a large single hook, making it easier to handle than does a lure with treble hooks. I use these spoons for most of my trolling in the inshore Gulf of Mexico. I will troll a #8 Rapala X rap when I see fish working on the surface.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

Anglers can catch Spanish mackerel right off of the beach. Artificial lures work best in this application as long casts are often needed. A heavier spoon or jig is a good choice. The best approach is to walk the beach while scanning the surface for signs of bait, fish, or bird activity. Schools of bait dimpling on the surface are always worth a cast or two. Anglers can check current regulations HERE

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

Sarasota speckled trout fishing, Sarasota fishing report

Sarasota speckled trout fishing is extremely popular. Speckled trout are arguably the most popular it saltwater inshore game fish in Florida. This is really true for the entire Gulf Coast.  An article on trout fishing follows my weekly Sarasota fishing report.

Weekly Sarasota fishing report

Angling success this week required me to keep moving on my Sarasota fishing charters.  Red tide has crept into Sarasota Bay.  The key to catching fish is to find “good” water.  The best water and spots this week were Bishop’s Pt., Buttonwood, Long Bar, and Stephen’s Pt.  Speckled trout and ladyfish were fairly plentiful.  Several times we ran across schools of jack crevelle foraging on the surface.  This is very exciting!  These fish are very aggressive and hit lures with gusto.  Bluefish were mixed in with them as well.  A few decent mangrove snapper were caught, too.

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

The wind eased up late in the week and we were able to find schools of “breaking” fish.  Clean water up in north Sarasota Bay had the fish bunched up pretty good.  Ladyfish and jacks were plentiful, with bluefish, Spanish mackerel, trout, and snapper mixed in.  Unfortunately, the red tide has been working north in Sarasota Bay.  I cancelled my Friday trip as the wind shifted west.  It was breezy and I did not think conditions would be good.  The odor was not nice, either.

Effective baits

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

Jigs and free lined live shrimp produced best this week.  A Gulp Shrimp on a 1/4 ounce jig head produced well.  Live shrimp on a #1 hook and a small split shot was effective as well.  Live shrimp can be small this time of year.  We call it “pee wee season”.  However, they did get a little better this week. 

One strategy that can be effective during red tide outbreaks is to fish “different” areas.  Fish will move out of their normal seasonal spots in search of water free of red tide.  This can push then into unconventional spots.  I don’t normally fish docks in canals and creeks this time of year.  However, we found success in Bowlees Creek up north, catching snapper, black drum, catfish, and other species bottom fishing with shrimp.

Speckled trout fishing in Sarasota

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

There are several reasons for the popularity of speckled trout. They are a beautiful fish. Speckled trout are abundant and available to coastal anglers throughout the state. Trout are aggressive, taking live bait, artificial lures, and flies. Lastly, they are fantastic table fare. What more could an angler ask for?

Most of the Sarasota speckled trout fishing is done on submerged grass beds in Sarasota Bay. A few trout are caught in the surf, in the passes, and near structure. However, the vast majority are found on grass flats in between four and ten feet of water. Some of the largest trout will be caught in very shallow water. These “gator” trout are normally loners and not in schools.

Trout tackle

Speckled trout can be caught using several different tactics and many different baits. This is one of the things that speckled trout so attractive to anglers. The oldest and still one of the most productive techniques is a live shrimp under a popping cork. This is a “system” that works very well on trout as well as other species on the grass flats.

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

Spinning tackle is the choice of most anglers fishing the inshore flats for speckled trout. A 6 ½ foot to 7 foot rod with a 3000 series reel is a versatile outfit. Ten pound monofilament line works well. Anglers who prefer braided line will do well with 20 lb braid. A 24” shock leader of 25lb to 30lb test finishes off the basic tackle.

The rig consists of a #1/0 live bait hook, 24” of 30 lb leader, and a noisy float or “cork”. These floats have a weight at the bottom and a concave top. It sits upright in the water and when the rod tip is sharply twitched, the cork “pops” in the water. This noise attracts fish as it imitates fish feeding on the surface. The depth can be adjusted, but generally three feet is a good depth.

Live bait for speckled trout

Anglers cast the rig out with a live shrimp hooked in the head under the horn. It is allowed to settle and then the cork is “popped”. The shrimp will rise up in the water then settle back down. Often times the bite occurs right after the cork is popped. When a fish pulls the cork under, the slack is eliminated and the hook is set. The process is repeated several times, then reeled in and cast back out.

Live bait fish such as pinfish and grunts can be used under a float as well. While difficult to obtain, there is no better bait for a nice speckled trout that a 3” grunt. Pilchards and threadfin herring can also be used. One new twist is to fish an artificial shrimp under a noisy cork. This works quite well!

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

Catching trout on artificial lures

Artificial lures are very effective for anglers Sarasota speckled trout fishing. The most popular lure is a lead head jig with some type of soft plastic body. ¼ ounce is a very good choice for a jig head. Most often, anglers will be fishing in six feet to eight feet of water. A ¼ ounce jig casts well and will get down in the water column.

Grub bodies come in all shapes, colors, and sizes. #3” to 4” baits work best in Sarasota Bay. That size matches the existing forage nicely. Shad tails have a great built in action and imitate bait fish nicely. Paddle tails and shrimp tails mimic shrimp, a favorite trout food. Color really is not all that important in most cases. The old saying “light colors in light water and dark colors in dark water” is a good guideline. White, pearl, glow, chartreuse, pink, olive, gold, rootbeer, and golden bream are all productive colors.

Scented baits

On days when the bite is tough, switching to scented soft plastic baits will sometimes get the bite going. The most effective scented soft plastic bait in this area are the Gulp line of baits. The 3” Gulp Shrimp has fooled many speckled trout on the west coast of Florida. It also works great fished under a cork with a 1/16 ounce jig head.

Plugs work well for speckled trout, too. Topwater plugs will catch large trout fished over bars and potholes on the high tide. First thing in the morning is the best time. MirrOlure makes several suspending plugs that have been catching trout for many years. The 52M series and Mirrodines work great.

Fly anglers are certainly not to be left out when it comes to Sarasota speckled trout fishing. Many speckled trout are fooled by skilled fly casters. The best out fit is a 7wt to 9wt rod with an intermediate sink tip line. A 9′ leader that tapers down to 20 lb tippet works fine. The most popular fly choice is the Clouser Minnow. Is is a weighted fly that actually fishes like a jig. Chartreuse and white is a proven color pattern.

Trout tactics

Speckled trout spend a lot of their lives loosely schooled over deep grass flats. Therefore, drifting the flats while fan casting out in front of the boat is an extremely effective technique. The best approach is to choose a flat where the wind and tide are moving in the same direction. This will facilitate a good drift.

Once some action is found, anglers have a choice. They can either continue continue the drift and then when the action slows motor around and drift again. Another approach is to quietly anchor the boat and thoroughly work the area with either lures or live bait.

One extremely productive technique is to chum with live bait. This works very well in the summer when bait is abundant and east to catch. A LOT of bait is required for this. Specialized equipment such as a cast net and the ability to toss it, a large well, and high volume pump are also needed.

Once the well is loaded up (“blacked out” as we call it) the boat in anchored in six feet of water or so. Anglers will do well to position the boat on the up-tide end of a good flat. Live bait fish are then tossed out behind the boat. Several baits are hooked up and cast out into the chum. If the trout and other game fish are around, it won’t take them long to show up. The chum will get them fired up and feeding.

Sarasota speckled trout fishing spots

The best flats in Sarasota Bay are from Siesta Key north. Bird Key, Radio Tower, Middlegrounds, Stephen’s Pt., Bishop’s Pt., Buttonwood, and Long Bar are the top spots. In the summer, the flats near the passes are usually the best spots to fish. Strong tidal flow and abundant bait fish as forage are a couple of reasons for this.

The area south, from Siesta Drive to Blackburn Pt. Does hold speckled trout. However, the character is I bit different. Grass beds are not at all plentiful. Most fish relate to oyster bars and mangrove shorelines. This area won’t produce the numbers of the north bay, but it will reward patient anglers with some quality fish.

Shallow water trout fishing

Some of the largest speckled trout will be caught in very shallow water. This seems like a contradiction, but it makes sense. Large fish do not need the safety of numbers. They also are less afraid of birds. Finally, large trout feed primarily on large baits such as pinfish, grunts, and mullet. They prefer one large meal versus a bunch of shrimp.

Shallow water trout fishing is very tide specific. Trout will position themselves on the edges of plats and in holes on the lower tide stages. As the water rises, they will fan out on the flats, scatter out, and feed. As the tide falls, trout will set up in likely ambush points. Bars that drop off, holes, and channels that run through flats are prime examples.

Tactics are a bit different in this “skinny” water. Topwater plugs are a good choice. They imitate a perfect sized mullet and will not hang up in the grass. Soft plastic baits used in conjunction with a weedless swim bait hook works well getting through the grass. If the grass is sparse or the tide high, a 1/8 ounce jig head with a 4” shad tail bait is a good choice. Weedless spoons will also produce in shallow water without hanging up.

Speckled trout fishing in winter

Speckled trout will move off of the flats in the winter if the water temperature drops into the mid 50’s. They will move to deeper holes, most of which are man made “dredge” holes. The same goes for channels cutting through a flat or near the edge. Trout will school up in the deeper, warmer water.

A jig bounced slowly off the bottom will catch these deep water trout. The fish will be a bit less active, so a more subtle presentation will usually be more productive. Live shrimp free lined with a split shot are seldom refused. It takes a bit of prospecting, but once a large school of trout is found, the action can be frantic.

Another productive winter Sarasota speckled trout fishing tactic is to anchor on the edge of a grass flat that drops off into deeper water. A free lined live shrimp with a small split shot works very well. Again, this can produce a lot of action if a school is found.

Silver trout

Sarasota speckled trout fishing

Silver trout are similar in appearance to speckled trout and are sometimes caught on the deep flats while speckled trout fishing.  They do not have spots and can have a purple back.  While they look similar, their habits are quite different.  Silver trout school up tightly in large numbers.  Once located, a bunch of them can be caught in short order. 

Silver trout are usually caught over sandy bottom in water, between 10′ and 20′ deep.  They are often targeted in the Gulf of Mexico, Point of Rocks is a top spot.  Jigs bounced on the bottom are very effective, as are live shrimp.  Silver trout pull surprisingly hard for their size.  There is no size or bag limit on silver trout.  They taste great but don’t freeze all that well.  The flesh can be a bit soft, so only keep enough for a couple of fresh fish dinners.

While speckled trout are outstanding table fare, it is very important to release the larger fish.  The current regulations allow anglers to keep three trout between 15″ and 19″ with one over 20″ per boat.  I strongly encourage the release of fish over 20″.  I do not kill them on my trips.  These are female breeders that we need to continue the success of the species.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Longboat Key fishing charters

Longboat Key fishing charters

Anglers taking out Longboat Key fishing charters can experience great action all year long. Longboat Key is eleven miles long and is just north of Lido Key. It is a bit quieter than some of the other keys but has some great accommodations and restaurants.  It also offers some great fishing!

Longboat Key offers good fishing all year long for a number of species.  The entire east side of Longboat Key has lush grass flats that hold a wide variety of fish species all year long. Residential canals offer refuge in cold weather. New Pass to the south and Longboat Pass to the north are fish highways, connecting Sarasota Bay to the Gulf of Mexico. The beaches off of Longboat Key provide fantastic fishing for both boat and shore anglers.

Longboat Key fishing charters

Read current Sarasota fishing report

I use light spinning tackle on my Longboat Key fishing charters. It is the best choice for most anglers. Ten pound spinning outfits allow anglers to cast light lures and baits and fish all morning comfortably. They are also light enough for kids to handle.

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

Longboat Key flats fishing

The deep grass flats off of Longboat Key in Sarasota Bay offer some of the best fishing in the area. The Middlegrounds, Country Club Shores, Bishop’s Pt, Buttonwood, Long Bar, and Whale Key are all legendary spots for speckled trout and other species. Along with trout, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, pompano, snapper, grouper, jack crevalle, sharks, cobia, ladyfish, and other species a re landed.

Drifting the deep grass flats is a very productive method. The majority of fish caught on my Sarasota fishing charters are caught employing this technique. It really is fairly uncomplicated, though there are nuances, as in all fishing. I position my boat upwind and up-tide of the flat I want to fish. Then, I let the wind and tide push the boat across the flat.

Longboat Key fishing charters

Anglers cast lures and live bait as we drift the flat. The most effective lure is a lead head jig with a soft plastic tail. One quarter ounce jigs work well with a 3” or 4” body. Shad tail, paddle tail, and shrimp bodies are the most popular baits. Colors vary; every angler has his or her favorite. I prefer glow, new penny, and red/gold, but many other colors work fine. Presentation and location are the more important factors.

Fishing with jigs on Longboat Key fishing charters

The jig is cast out and allowed to sink several feet. It is then retrieved back to the boat using sharp twitches. Jigs allow anglers to cover a lot of water. They also catch a lot of fish! Other artificial lures can be used with success. Silver spoons cast a long way and are great bait fish imitations. Plugs are effective as well, though the treble hooks can be an issue; they can damage fish that are to be released.

Live bait certainly works well on the deep grass flats. A live shrimp is without question the top live bait. Shrimp catch every fish species that swims. Live shrimp can be “free lined” on the deeper flats. That means the shrimp id hooked and allowed to swim without any weight.

Anglers fishing water that is five feet or shallower will often times need a float to suspend the shrimp up off the bottom. A “popping cork” is widely used here in Sarasota Bay. It keeps the shrimp out of the grass, provides casting weight, and indicated when a fish takes the bait.

Shallow water flats fishing on Longboat Key fishing charters

Shallow bars and flats all along the east side of Longboat Key hold snook, redfish, and jacks. Fishing these shallow flats can be a bit more challenging. Fish are spooky in water less than three feet deep. Tactics and baits need to change as well to avoid hanging up.

Topwater baits are an obvious choice for anglers fishing shallow. They float on the surface and their erratic action irritates and excites game fish, eliciting a strike. Weedless spoons are a great choice and are a proven redfish bait. These baits can be cast a long distance and run in water as shallow as a foot deep. Spoons are great locator baits as anglers can cover a lot of water in short order.

Longboat Key fishing charters

Soft plastic baits are extremely effective in shallow water as well. Light jig heads can be used when grass is on the sparse side. Weighted, weedless swim bait hooks work great when the grass is a bit thicker.

Tides are very important in saltwater fishing. Tides will position and locate fish. Many anglers prefer an incoming tide when flats fishing. I personally don’t care, as long as the water is moving. Tides are crucial when fishing shallow. Low tides will concentrate fish in deeper water. Fish will scatter out on a flat when the tide is high.

Fishing Longboat Key canals

There are countless residential canals along the east side of Longboat Key, including the Rim Canal, which runs the length of the key. The water is generally fairly deep, by Florida standards. Docks provide cover and forage. Fish will move into these canals when the water gets cold on the open flats. Snook, redfish, black drum, flounder, sheepshead, snapper and other species are caught in these areas.

The best approach when fishing docks and canals is to fish live shrimp near and under structure. A large, live shrimp is seldom refused. Anglers will also catch fish casting artificial lures along mangrove shorelines and near docks. Rapala X-Raps and jigs work best.

Fishing the Longboat Key passes

New Pass and Longboat Pass are great spots to fish, especially in the spring and fall. Both passes are also accessible to anglers without a boat. Pompano will stage in the passes and feed. The best pompano bait is a small jig with short dressing. These are specially made for pompano and their small mouths. Bouncing these jigs along the bottom will fool them.

Longboat Key fishing charters

Spanish mackerel, bluefish, and ladyfish will school up thick in the passes and feed heavily. Artificial lures such as jigs and plugs will do well on these actively feeding fish. Trolling can be a good strategy to locate fish in the passes. Free lining live bait or hooking them on a jig head and bouncing them off the bottom will produce as well.

Structure in both New Pass and Longboat Pass will attract a lot of fish. This structure included the two bridges, numerous docks, and shoreline rip rap. Sheepshead will gang up in huge schools from January through April. Mangrove snapper are available all year. Live shrimp works best for these tasty bottom feeding saltwater pan fish.

Snook will be located in the passes as well in the summer. They will move out of the flats and out into the passes on their way out to the beaches to spawn. Some of the largest snook of the year are caught by anglers fishing live bait fish near structure in the passes.

Inshore Gulf of Mexico fishing

Action in the Gulf of Mexico just off of the Longboat Key beaches can be nothing short of fantastic when conditions are good. Light east winds will result in calm seas and clear water. This will attract both bait fish and in turn, game fish. Spanish mackerel, false albacore, sharks, and cobia are caught in the spring and fall. Tarpon are available in summer. Bottom fish are taken off of the nearshore artificial reefs all year.

Casting to “breaking” mackerel and false albacore is a favorite fishing charter! Fish are seen actively feeding on the helpless bait fish. Fish are literally jumping out of the water. Birds are diving, it is great fun! Anglers cast lures into the melee and an instant hook-up is almost always the result. Spoons, jigs, and plugs all produce, but honestly, just about any bait that is close to the right size will get bit.

The approach is pretty simple. I just run out one of the passes and start looking for fish. The three reefs off of Lido Key are always a good place to start as they hold a bunch of bait. Point of Rocks is another good spot, as is Whitney Beach rocks on the north end of Longboat Key. Birds wheeling and diving are always a great sign. Once fish are spotted, I ease the boat into position.

Trolling on Longboat Key fishing charters

Trolling is a great way to locate fish when they are not showing on the surface. Spoons and plugs being trolled behind the boat using either planers or weights will find the fish. Once located, anglers can then cast to them. This is one situation where free lining live bait is a good option.

This is a great opportunity for clients who fly fish to experience world class action! False albacore are incredible sport on a 9wt fly rod. Anglers targeting Spanish mackerel will do well using a 7wt outfit. Small while bait fish imitations are the best flies to use.

Longboat Key tarpon fishing

Giant tarpon show up off of the Longboat Key beaches in May. This is truly big game fishing. It is a charter best suited for more experienced anglers. It is a lot like hunting and patience is required. There will be days when no tarpon are hooked. But, when it all comes together, it is incredible!

I get my clients out on the beach just before first light. We sit there about a hundred yards offshore and look for pods of tarpon moving through. I then position the boat so that my anglers can cast out if front of them. We use heavy spinning tackle and live crabs or bait fish such as pin fish and sardines.

There are three artificial reefs just off of New Pass at the south end of Longboat Key. These hold fish all year long. Bottom fishing for snapper and sheepshead is easy and a great option for novice anglers and children. It is as simple as dropping a shrimp down to the bottom. Spanish mackerel and false albacore will also school there, attracted to the large schools of bait.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q:  Do guests on Longboat Key fishing charters need a license?

A:  No.  Florida has a provision where anglers going out on paid charters with a professional, licensed fishing captain.  This is a very convenient feature as it saves clients the time and inconvenience of having to purchase a Florida saltwater fishing license.  However, visitors who want to fish on their own, even from shore, will need to obtain one.  The FWC makes this easy to do.  HERE is a link to the FWC website, where anglers can purchase a license.

Q:  Where do clients going out on Longboat Key fishing charters meet?

A:  I meet most of my clients at the boat ramp on Ken Thompson Parkway.  There is ample parking, a nice restroom, and docks for easy loading and unloading.  It is also very centrally located as it puts us right in the heart of the prime fishing grounds with very little idle time.  Occasionally clients will be picked up at alternate locations such as their condo dock.

Q:  What kind of fish are caught on Longboat Key fishing charters and can clients keep fish to eat?

A:  Clients are likely to catch six to eight different fish species on a four hour trip.  Sarasota Bay and the Gulf of Mexico offer anglers the chance to catch many different species.  Speckled trout, snook, redfish, jack crevelle, Spanish mackerel, flounder, snapper, grouper, drum, sea bass, pompano, bluefish, cobia, sharks, tarpon, ladyfish, and catfish are commonly caught by anglers on Longboat Key fishing charters.  While I am proponent of catch and release, I certainly don’t mind if clients keep a couple of fish for a meal.  I will fillet and bag them at the end of the charter.

Q:  How much does a fishing charter cost and what does it include?

A:  A four hour fishing charter for one to four anglers is $400.  Four hours is plenty for most anglers.  More experienced clients may choose a six hour trip, that cost is $550.  Fishing charters include all bait and tackle for the charter.  While I supply all rods and reels, customers may certainly bring along their favorite rod along.  A cooler with ice is also provided, as is a fishing license for all guests.  Clients should bring whatever they want to eat and drink, hats, sunglasses, sunscreen, comfortable shoes, and appropriate clothing.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Sarasota Freshwater Fishing

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Sarasota freshwater fishing is an underutilized and overlooked resource for visiting anglers. Saltwater fishing gets the bulk of the attention in Sarasota. Very good freshwater fishing can be experienced in several watersheds close to Sarasota and her beaches.

The three primary freshwater systems are the Myakka River, Braden River, and Manatee River watersheds. All three are similar in a couple of ways. Small rivers flow into damned lakes. These portions are entirely freshwater. The water is brackish below the dams. Brackish rivers hold both freshwater and saltwater species.

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Manatee River system

Lake Manatee lies in Manatee County about 10 miles east of I-75 on SR 64. There are two access points the Lake Manatee for boating anglers. Lake Manatee State Park has a surfaced ramp and great facilities and is near the dam. There is also an unimproved ramp at the State Road 64 bridge several miles upstream from the dam. Lake Manatee supplies to drinking water for much of Sarasota and Manatee County. Water levels in lake Manatee are controlled by the dam.

Click on the title link to read Capt Jim’s E-book Fishing for Crappie, Bluegill, and Panfish

The State Road 64 bridge is a natural divider in Lake Manatee the portion east of the bridge has a river like feel to it. It is narrower with a deep winding channel. Lake Manatee Fish Camp is on the dirt road leading to the landing.  Anglers can purchase bait, drinks, and snacks there. The main lake lies between the State Road 64 bridge and the dam. Lake Manatee is similar to a northern lake. It is deeper than most Florida lakes, reaching 50 feet in several places. It also has a distinct river channel, which is the main structure in the lake.

Fishing Lake Manatee

Lake Manatee offers very good fishing for bass, bream, and catfish. There are some very large catfish in lake Manatee. Crappie, also known as speckled perch, are probably the most sought after species in lake Manatee. Sunshine bass are stocked there as well. These are a striped bass and white bass hybrid. Northern anglers will recognize them as wipers or hybrids. It is basically the same species. 

Anglers fishing the Manatee River down stream from the dam can launch boats and rent canoes and kayaks at Ray’s Canoe Hideaway.  There is also a nice ramp and park with facilities at Ft. Hamer.  This is a very nice park adjacent to the new bridge crossing the river.  Most of the freshwater fishing will be east, or up-river, from Ft. Hamer.

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Myakka River system

Upper Myakka Lake lies totally within the boundaries of Myakka River State Park. It is in Sarasota County 7 miles east of I-75 on State Road 72. This lake as much more typical of Florida lakes. A small, shallow river feeds the lake. The water is held back by a simple weir dam. Water then flows down a narrow river to lower Myakka Lake. The lower lake can only be accessed by foot or by River. It is very shallow and weedy. There is another small weir dam which stops tidal water from entering the system. Fishing is good in both the lakes and connecting river.  The river between the two lakes gets very little pressure and offers good fishing for kayak anglers.

Upper Myakka Lake has a very good population of bass some of them quite large. It also has a very good population of bluegill, stump knocker, catfish, and crappie.The lake is very weedy and shallow, with the deepest portion being about 5 feet deep. The best fishing is generally when the water levels are up. Fishing can be tough in the winter during the drought when the water is low. A surfaced ramp exist on the lake inside the State Park.

Braden River system

The Braden River is the most convenient to Sarasota. It lies west of I-75 just off State Road 70. There is a very nice boat ramp at Jiggs Landing along with a bait and snack store, canoe rentals, and even cabin rentals. The Braden River flows into Lake Evers. This lake has a uniform depth of around 20 feet with very little structure on the bottom. Bass, bluegill, and crappie are the primary species.  Access to the lake and river is from the park at Jiggs Landing.

Sarasota freshwater fishing

All three rivers offer anglers the chance to catch snook in the cooler months. While snook are saltwater fish, they can survive quite well and absolute freshwater. Snook move up into these rivers to find warmer water and forage when it gets cold. The Myakka and Manatee rivers are brackish below the dam, while the Braden is pure salt water.

Ponds are abundant and offer Sarasota freshwater fishing. Many housing developments have retention ponds. These are areas designed to catch excess rainfall. Almost all of them have bass and bluegill in them. Many are private, but there are also a lot of public ponds, particularly in Lakewood Ranch. These are a great option for anglers without a boat, kayak, or canoe.

Sarasota panfish

I really enjoy Sarasota freshwater fishing for panfish (AKA bream). It might sound odd that being a full-time fishing guide, that I would spend my time fishing for these little guys. However, I find it very relaxing and enjoyable. They are also fabulous eating! Florida is blessed with many different pan fish species. Bluegill, shallow cracker, stump knocker, war mouth, along with crappie are caught by anglers using ultralight tackle.

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Personally, I prefer to fish for bream with artificial lures. My go to lure is a 1/16 ounce black Beetlespin. I have caught just about every freshwater species using this little lure! Small jigs are also extremely effective. A tiny chartreuse curly tail jig on a 1/16 ounce jig head is deadly on bream and small bass. It mimics the small bait fish that are in most Florida lakes. Tiny plugs can also be effective, especially for anglers targeting the larger specimens.

Live bait certainly catches plenty of bream. Crickets and red wigglers are the two top live baits for anglers Sarasota freshwater fishing. They are most often fished a couple feet under a small float. This is as basic as fishing gets. Ultralight spinning or spend cast tackle with 4 to 6 pound line works great. Cane poles still have their place in freshwater, and have accounted for many a fish dinner.

Panfish tactics

Catching bream is not very complicated. The key to success is moving around until a school of fish is located. Shoreline cover, especially with fallen trees, are prime spots. Edges of weed beds are also great places to look for panfish. Anglers can cast small artificial lures or live baits towards the spots. When using artificial lures, a slow steady retrieve is preferred. Do not get to aggressive, it will spook the fish.

Trolling is also an extremely successful technique when searching out panfish. Crappie in particular are targeted using this method. I like to slowly troll the edge of a weed line for bluegill and stumpknocker.  I use two rods, one with a jig on one rod and a Beetlespin on the other. If bluegill are around, this will usually find them.

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Trolling for crappie, especially in Lake Manatee where it is deeper, is a bit more technical. One of the best lures is a Blakemore Road Runner. This is a small jig with a spinner attached to it. Bright colors produce best in the dark Lake Manatee water. The most productive technique is to slowly troll back and forth over the edges of the submerged river channel. Crappie will school up on these edges. Once a school is located, the action can be fast and furious!

Largemouth bass fishing in Sarasota

While fishing for bream is fun and puts fillets on the table, there is little doubt that the largemouth bass is king of freshwater. Florida is famous and well-known for its giant largemouth bass. Sarasota has some very good bass fishing, however it is not well-known for the giant bass. Lake Manatee and Myakka Lake have good populations of one pound to 5 pound largemouth. However 10 pound bass are not common, by any means.

Sarasota bass fishing

Many different techniques and lures will produce largemouth bass when Sarasota freshwater fishing. Soft plastic baits are extremely productive and are probably the most popular artificial lures for bass. Every angler has his or her favorite soft plastic, but all will catch fish if presented properly. I personally prefer the Senko worms.  Lighter colors such as watermelon work in clear water and darker colors such as golden bream are better in dark water.

Soft plastic baits can be rigged several different ways. In shallow water can be rigged without any weight on a weedless hook. The wacky warm hook works really well with these finesse baits. At times a heavier weight will be required. Deeper water and punching through heavy vegetation will require a 1/2 ounce to 1 ounce sinker.

More lures for bass

Top water plugs are great fun to fish and will elicit some exciting strikes! Again, angler preferences will very, but I prefer the Rapala Prop R. It has a bullet nose with a propeller on the rear. It produces great action and commotion. Poppers such as the Chug Bug are very effective, as are walk the dog baits such as the Zara Spook.  Shallow diving plugs such as the Rapala X-Rap work very well, too.

Spinnerbaits catch a lot of bass! They are easy to use and work well through moderate amounts of vegetation. White is a very good color in the tannin stained waters.  They are versatile, productive, and easy for novice anglers Sarasota bass fishing.

While I don’t use live bait very often for largemouth bass, that is just a personal preference. More large bass are landed in Florida using live shiners that all other baits combined. Heavier tackle is required as a ten inch shiner cast into heavy vegetation may fool a trophy bass. Nightcrawlers are also very effective. The best approach is to use a number one hook, and hook the worm in the front using no weight. This will let it swim seductively and naturally in the water.

River snook fishing

Sarasota freshwater fishing

While snook are technically a saltwater species, they can live in true fresh water.  Snook are one of the few fish species that migrate into fresh water for reasons other than to spawn.  They do so to escape the temperature extremes of the saltwater flats.  River water is darker, deeper, and therefore warmer.  Forage is plentiful in rivers as well. 

Snook are ambush predators, just like bass.  They will take up residence in spots that provide cover and a break from the current.  Outside bends in the river with some cover such as fallen trees are high percentage spots.  Lures that trigger strikes and cover a lot of water work best.  I have found shallow diving plugs to be the best all around lures for river snook fishing.

Tides are a factor in both the Myakka and Manatee Rivers.  Anglers not accustomed to dealing with tides will have to learn how they affect the fishing.  This is particularly true in the cooler months when the water levels are low.  High, falling tides are best as they create a nice current.  Anglers fishing the Myakka River can use El Jobean tides and add two hours.  Manatee River anglers use Redfish Pt. and add one hour.

Sarasota catfish

Sarasota freshwater fishing

Catfish are another popular species targeted by anglers Sarasota freshwater fishing. Lake Manatee has an excellent population of large catfish. Both the Myakka and Manatee rivers also hold some nice catfish. They are also easier to locate in rivers. Outside bends in the rivers with deep holes and structure are almost a sure bet for catfish. Fishing on the bottom with live or cut bait is productive.

Fly fisherman are not to be left out, either. A 3wt to 4wt outfit is perfect for bluegill, while an 8wt outfit is better when targeting largemouth bass. Floating lines and short leaders make for easy fly fishing. Short casts are the norm. Small poppers, Wooly Buggers, and tiny bait fish imitations work well on bream. Largemouth bass will hit similar flies, though in larger patterns. Deceiver  flies in “bluegill” pattern works quite well.

Anglers fly fishing for snook in the rivers should choose a 9 wt outfit.  An intermediate sink tip line is best as the fly needs to get down in the current.  Weighted flies such as the Clouser Minnow are a proven snook fly.  Gold and black along with “Firetiger” are good color patterns.

In closing, there are many options for anglers going out on Sarasota fishing charters.  Sarasota freshwater fishing is a great option for clients seeking a different experience.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

 

Best 6 Sarasota fishing lures

Best 6 Sarasota fishing lures

It comes as a surprise to many visiting anglers that artificial lures can, at times, out fish live baits. As a full-time fishing guide in Sarasota, being flexible in adapting to conditions is critical to success. I use artificial lures very often on my charters, especially in the cooler months. Here is my list of the best 6 Sarasota fishing lures.

My 6 best Sarasota fishing lures are as follows;

  • Bass Assassin jig and grub
  • Rapala X-Rap
  • Gulp Shrimp
  • Johnson spoon
  • MirrOlure Mirrodine
  • Key Largo pompano jig.  These are all lures that have proven themselves over the years for my clients on my Sarasota fishing charters.  These lures cover the entire water column, from the surface to the bottom.  They can also be fished as shallow as a foot up to the deepest water in Big Pass.

Sarasota pompano fishing

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so on the PRODUCTS page.

View current Sarasota fishing report HERE

Artificial lures are effective for a number of reasons. While live bait primarily produces when fish are hungry, lures will elicit strikes under other conditions. Fish will hit lures out of anger, competitiveness, excitement, or curiosity. A lure can be used to aggravate a fish into biting, that is something a live bait won’t do. This makes artificial lures effective when fish are both actively feeding and in a more challenging mood.

Artificial baits allow anglers to cover a lot more water than live baits.  This is crucial to success when fish are scattered over a large area.  Many of the best deep grass flats are large areas. Lures are usually the best option to eliminate unproductive water as quickly and efficiently as possible. Artificial lures are also a lot of fun to fish.  They are a bit more interactive and many anglers get more satisfaction out of fooling a fish on “fake” baits.

4″ Bass Assassin Sea Shad on a 1/4 ounce jig head

best 6 Sarasota fishing lures

The most popular and effective artificial lure on the West Coast of Florida, and really the entire Gulf Coast, is the jig and grub combo. Jigs are inexpensive, easy to use, and effective on a wide variety of species. They can be set up to mimic bait fish or crustaceans. The single hook on a jig also allows for a less invasive release of the fish.

My personal favorite soft plastic bait is the Bass Assassin line of baits. They offer jig heads in several different styles with long shank hooks, wide gap hooks, and different head sizes and colors. The 4 inch Sea Shad tail works very well for me here in Sarasota. Colors are endless, with my favorites being Red Gold Shiner, New Penny, and glow chartreuse.

Jig sizes and designs

inshore saltwater fishing

Jig heads come in a wide variety of sizes styles and colors. Despite that, they are all basically the same. A jig head is basically a hook with a lead weight at the front near the eye. This design allows for some weight to be cast out easily. It also gives the jig a seductive, erratic motion in the water. The most widely used jig size here in Sarasota is a 1/4 ounce. Anglers fishing shallow water will need to go down to a 1/8 or even a 1/16 ounce jig head. Conversely, anglers fishing deeper water or in heavier current may need to bump up the jig weight to 3/8 ounce or even a 1/2 ounce in extreme conditions.

Bass Assassin Sea Shad baits are very easy to use. They can be cast out and retrieved at a steady pace. But, the more effective retrieve is a jig and fall retrieve. The jig is cast out, allowed to sink several seconds, then the rod tip twitched sharply. The jig is then allowed to fall, seemingly helpless. This is the action that triggers most strikes, therefore most strikes occur on the fall. They are effective in almost every angling application. The deep grass flats, passes, backwaters for snook and redfish, and inshore Gulf of Mexico when fish are breaking are all situations in which the Bass assassin 4 inch see Shad is an effective bait.

#8 Rapala X-Rap Slash bait

best 6 Sarasota fishing lures

Plugs have been around freshwater and saltwater fishing for a long time. In freshwater, they are used to mimic a variety of different types of prey. Here in Florida, the primary use is to imitate a wounded bait fish. They do that very effectively! Plugs can be cast a long way and are great to cover a lot of water in a reasonable amount of time. They also elicit some very exciting strikes. One negative of fishing with plugs is the treble hooks. However, several manufacturers, including Rapala, are offering plugs with a single wide gap hook.

My favorite plug is the Rapala X-Rap Slash bait in the number eight size. This slender bait is several inches long and mimics the size, shape, and color of the bait fish that are prevalent in the area. Olive is a very good producer in water that has a little color to it. Ghost is a fantastic color in very clear water and out in the inshore Gulf of Mexico.  Rapala X-Raps work very well trolled out in the Gulf of Mexico as well as in Sarasota Bay.

Sarasota Spanish mackerel fishing

These small plugs have produced many nice catches for clients on my Sarasota fishing charters. They are fairly easy to use, with a great built in action. They float on the surface, then dive down a couple feet when retrieved. X-Raps have a great erratic action that triggers some vicious strikes.

Rapala plugs are quite versatile

Rapala plugs are effective in a wide range of angling applications. I use them a lot when targeting snook, redfish, and jacks around oyster bars, mangrove shorelines, and docks. They work very well when trolled in rivers, creeks, and residential canals in the winter. Rapala X-Raps are great fun whenever fish are breaking on the surface. This definitely includes inshore Gulf of Mexico action for Spanish mackerel and false albacore. They are also extremely effective when cast over shallow grass flats that have bait working on them.

The best retrieve when using these plugs is a twitch and pause. The lure is cast out, retrieve quickly for a few feet, then allowed to pause. Short twitches of the rod tip will impart a darting action. Often times, the strike occurs as the bait sits there motionless. Care does need to be taken when using plugs, especially with multiple anglers on the boat. Treble hooks can be dangerous both when casting and releasing fish.

3″ Gulp Shrimp

There are times when the bite can be slow, and this is when I switch to scented grubs. The best one by far, in my opinion, is the Gulp line of baits. Gulp Shrimp in the 3 inch size work very well, in some cases better than a live shrimp. These baits can be extremely productive, especially for speckled trout when conditions are a bit tough.

The formula that was created for the gulp shrimp is very effective. It is more than just a soft plastic immersed in a scent. The scent is actually built into the bait itself. In all honesty, color matters very little, in my opinion. It is all about the scent! As with other baits, they come in many different sizes, shapes, and colors. The 3 inch shrimp is the most effective size here in Sarasota. Glow, root beer, and new penny are the top colors.

Spanish mackerel fishing tips

Gulp Shrimp can be used just like any other soft plastic, rigged on a quarter ounce jig head. Anglers will usually have a bit more success with the Gulp Shrimp working them a bit slower. As stated, the sent is the primary attraction, so the bait should be work just above the grass or bottom in a subtle hopping motion.  They can even be brought back in using a steady retrieve, just above the grass.

Another popular way to use a Gulp Shrimp is under a noisy cork. This is very popular in Louisiana and Texas. Noisy floats such as the Cajun Thunder have a concave face which gives off a distinct popping sound when twitched. A 2 foot to 3 foot leader is tied to the bottom of the cork, followed by a 1/8 ounce jig head. The gulp shrimp is then added to the jig head hook. The rig is cast out, allowed the settle, and worked back in a series of aggressive twitches. In most cases, the more noise the better! This is just like using a live shrimp under a popping cork, and can be just as effective.

1/2 ounce gold Johnson weedless spoon

Johnson spoons have been around a long time, originating as a freshwater bass lure. The spoon was designed to work through lily pads and other freshwater vegetation without hanging up.

Sarasota fishing charter

The 1/2 ounce gold weedless Johnson spoon is a mainstay of redfish anglers all over the country. They can be cast a very long way and worked through shallow grass without snagging the bottom. They have a single hook which rides upper right allowing for good hook sets without catching on the grass.

There are two attributes of the Johnson weedless spoon that make it so effective. They have the ability to run very shallow while still given off a wobbling, seductive action and the ability to cover a lot of water in a short amount of time. Redfish and snook will scatter over the shallow grass flats and stage in potholes and other areas. The Johnson spoon cast very far and this allows anglers to eliminate unproductive water efficiently. They do come in silver as well, but gold is a more effective color in the slightly stained waters where redfish and snook generally live.

17MR-808 MirrOlure Mirrodine

the 17 MR 808 MirrOlure Mirrodine is an absolutely perfect replica of one of our top baits; the scaled sardine. Also known as shiners, white bait, pilchard, and greenback, it is a primary forage of many game fish in Sarasota and throughout the entire Southeast United States. The number 18 color, green back with a white belly, is a very popular color pattern. As with all manufacturers, MirrOlure offers many different sizes and colors, but this particular pattern works extremely well here in Sarasota.

The MirrOlure Mirrodine is a suspending twitch bait. It does not have a bill as do many plugs. It has a more subtle action which at times is extremely effective. The lure sinks very slowly and is retrieved back using short twitches with a pause in between. The bait suspends, hanging there motionless, an action which drives fish crazy. This bait is most effective and water 5 feet deep or less.  It is deadly when fished over bars on a high tide.

1/4 ounce Key Largo pompano jig

Pompano jigs are very plain looking. This belies the fact that they are very effective artificial baits. Pompano jigs have a round fairly heavy head with a short, smallish hook and some dressing. This dressing is usually nylon and extends just beyond the bend of the hook. The 1/4 ounce Key Largo pompano jig works very well, and is quite economical. Chartreuse and white are the two most popular colors.

fishing with jigs

Pompano jigs are simple and easy to use. They are extremely effective in the passes where they are fished vertically. The angler simply drops the jig down to the bottom and is hopped as the boat drifts along. These baits imitate small crabs and shrimp that live near the bottom. Each time the jig is lifted and falls it kicks up a little puff of sand. This is very natural and will fool pompano, ladyfish, and other species in the passes.

The Key Largo pompano jig can also be used effectively on the deep grass flats. There will be some days where the fish actually prefer the smaller profile especially in the cooler weather. It is especially effective over flats that have a mottled bottom with areas of sand interspersed with the grass. These jigs generally will not catch as many speckled trout as the jig and grub combo well, however it catches everything else and will catch more Pompano.

Pompano jigs work very well for anglers fishing off of the beach.  Anglers can “tip the jig” by adding a small piece of shrimp to the hook.  This is an effective method used to catch whiting, silver trout, and other species out of the surf, especially in the cooler months.

Plug fishing article

Jessica made a perfect cast placing her plug right next to the dock piling on the up current side. A sharp twitch of her rod to caused the Rapala to dive a couple of feet below the surface and dart seductively. On the third pause, the lure just stopped and a nice redfish boiled on the surface, furious at the hook stuck in its lower jaw. Several minutes and a half dozen head-shaking runs later, the slot size red came alongside, posed for a quick picture, and was released back into the water to contemplate its recent adventure. Two hours of afternoon plug casting resulted in this red small snook, several Jack crevelle and ladyfish.

I love fishing, but I really love plug fishing! The reason? Plugs are very productive on a wide variety of species and are a blast to use. Casting is half the fun, making accurate casts under mangrove trees or near docks is very satisfying and challenging. Bites range from subtle takes to downright ferocious strikes. Anglers need to take care, however.  Anytime a lure with multiple treble hooks in involved, extra caution is required.  Plugs come in many colors, shapes, and sizes, but can be broken down into two categories: surface or top water plugs and sub-surface baits.

plug fishing Sarasota

Top water plugs

Top water plugs come in two styles; poppers and walk the dog baits. Poppers are very easy to fish and are quite effective. The Rapala Skitter Pop, Rebel Pop R, and Chug Bug are three popular examples. These are floating baits that have a concave face. The technique is simple; cast it out, let it settle for a moment, then twitch the rod tip sharply causing the face of the plug to dig into the water and make a loud “pop”. The famous Zara Spook is the best-known example of a walk the dog. The Rapala Skitterwalk and MirrOlure Top Dogs are also local favorites. The retrieve is a bit more difficult to master. After being cast out, the rod tip is held down near the water and a rhythmic twitching retrieve causes the lure to dance back and forth on the surface.

One common mistake anglers make plug fishing Sarasota is working top water baits to quickly and aggressively. This is particularly true on a very calm day. Slow, subtle action will generally draw more strikes. Another mistake often made is striking too soon. The sight of a large predator blowing up on the top water plug is very exciting, often resulting in a reflex strike that pulls the lure out of the fishes mouth. Instead, wait until the weight of the fish is felt and set the hook in a smooth, sideways manner. This is safer as well.

Diving plugs

While a top water strike can be spectacular, more fish are caught on subsurface baits. Most of these lures float on the surface and dive down when retrieved Primarily, the lip on the lure determines the depth the plug will run. However, line size and speed are also factors. Lure manufacturers will have the pertinent information on the box. Rapala X-Raps are my personal favorites.

Siesta Key fishing charters

Plugs are available in a wide variety of colors and sizes. Generally speaking lures that dive down to to 5 feet are the most effective in our local waters. Match the size of the plug to the available forage. Olive is my favorite all-around color, but gold and black and chartreuse work great in stained water, and pearl and silver are very effective in clear water.

Suspending plug such as the venerable MirrOlure can be deadly, particularly on speckled trout. They sink slowly and are worked back with a twitch and pause retrieve. That pause, where the bait just suspends, seemingly helpless, really triggers the strikes. Lipless crank baits, such as the Rattletrap are very easy to use. Just cast it out and reel it back in; they have a great built in action. Chrome with a blue back is the favorite color when plug fishing Sarasota.

Tackle requirements

I use the same basic rod and reel combos for most of my inshore fishing. Spinning reels matched to 6 1/2 to 7 foot rods with either 10 pound monofilament or 20 pound braided work well. I like the monofilament in open water in the braided line when fishing around structure. A 24 inch to 30 inch piece of fluorocarbon leader is attached to the end of the running line. 30 pounds is a good starting test for leader, though you may need to bump it up when fishing for big snook or toothy mackerel.

Plugs are versatile; just about every game fish that inhabits the Suncoast will devour them. In addition to casting to structure for snook, redfish, jacks, and other species, plugs are deadly when fished over the grass flats. On a recent charter I had a pair of 11-year-old boys score on a bunch of Spanish mackerel using a number eight Olive X Rap. The boys cast into thick bait schools near Big Pass and burned the baits back as fast as they could turn the real handle. Needless to say, the strikes were explosive!

Plugs catch big fish!

Plugs also catch a lot of speckled trout, oftentimes fooling larger than average sized fish. Top water baits are an excellent choice for fishing very shallow water early and then late in the day. In the summer, shallow bars on the edge of grass flats load up with bait, which in turn attracts game fish. Add in a high tide at first light and the result is an excellent situation to catch a nice fish on top water.

Suspending plugs such as the MirrOlure are deadly on speckled trout when fished over the deeper grass, in 4 to 8 feet of water. They also fool mackerel, bluefish, jacks, and other species. These baits do not have a lip, therefore they do not dive. Instead they are cast out and allowed to sink for several seconds, then twitched sharply. The lure just hangs there motionless, helpless, inducing a fish to strike it.

Trolling with plugs

Trolling plugs is a great technique to locate fish when scattered about in a large area. This also works well with children and novice anglers; if they can hold rod they can catch a fish. This applies to the inshore bays, passes, and Gulf of Mexico. That number eight Olive saltwater X rap is my go to lure for trolling. Simply let out half the line, close the bail, and drive the boat around just above idle speed. Sometimes working the rod tip will elicit more strikes.

One trick that served me well on charters when plug fishing Sarasota is to troll the passes. The traditional method is to drift with the current and cast jigs plugs or spoons. Once the drift is complete the boat idles back up and drift is repeated. As you idle back to the start, why not drag plug behind? Many mornings I catch more Spanish mackerel this way, as they prefer a fast-moving bait.

Casting and trolling plugs in the inshore Gulf of Mexico is an extremely effective technique in the spring and again in the fall when pelagic species move through. A large Yozuri 3-D will produce some very nice king mackerel and large Spanish mackerel. Look for birds and bait schools on the surface and troll around the edges of the bait, not right through the middle. The inshore reefs off of Lido Key hold a lot of fish and are very reliable producers.

Sight casting to breaking fish is terrific sport! Spanish mackerel and false albacore will often be seen tearing up schools of helpless baitfish on the surface. Spanish will stay on top longer and not move as much is the false albacore. The Albies can also be very fussy; you need to scale down the offering and go lighter on the leader. With either species, ease the boat into position and cast into the fish or troll around the edge of them and be prepared to hear your drag scream! Anglers can also employ the same tactics from the beach to catch Spanish mackerel.

River fishing

plug fishing Sarasota

In the cooler months snook migrate into creeks canals and rivers. The Phillippi Creek, Bowley’s Creek, Hudson Bayou, and area residential canals on Siesta Key all hold fish. The Manatee, Braden, and Myakka Rivers are all productive winter spots. The fish are scattered and plugs allow an angler to cover a lot of water effectively and thoroughly. Black and gold is an excellent color combination in the tannin stained water, as are bright patterns such as fire tiger. If you venture far enough upstream, don’t be surprised if a nice largemouth bass intercepts your offering meant for a snook.

River fishing is a charter that is best for more experienced anglers.  This is more of a “quality over quantity” trip.  Some trips come up empty, though not very often.  But, there is a chance to land a trophy snook on every river fishing charter.  Along with the large snook, average sized fish in the 18″ to 24′ range are commonly caught.  Largemouth bass, jack crevelle, are also available and are a fun by-catch!

Top river spots when plug fishing Sarasota

Outside bends in the river are prime spots to hold snook.  The deeper holes in the rivers will be found on the bends.  The current carves out a deep hole in these spots.  If cover such as fallen trees exists, that even improves the chances of catching a nice snook!  Tides are crucial as well.  Outgoing tides are preferred.  If these tides occur early or late in the day, better yet.  The ideal river fishing conditions would be as flows.  A high, outgoing tide first thing in the morning with cloud cover and even some light rain falling.

While saltwater fishing gets the majority of the attention in Sarasota, there are freshwater opportunities as well. Myakka River State Park has upper Myakka Lake in the river flowing through it. Both offer opportunities to catch bass, bream, crappie and other species using plugs very small number for Apple is working very well cast towards lily pads and other shoreline vegetation.

Lake Manatee is another local productive freshwater lake. It is quite a bit larger and deeper and offers excellent trolling for crappie in the fall and early winter. The Manatee River flows from the dam towards Tampa Bay it has a good population of largemouth bass sunshine bass a local hybrid and snook as well.

I hope the list of my best 6 Sarasota fishing lures was informative and helps anglers catch more fish!

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Fly fishing Sarasota rivers

Fly fishing Sarasota rivers

Sarasota offers visitors a unique angling opportunity; fly fishing Sarasota rivers.  While the saltwater fishing gets the attention, Sarasota has some great river fly fishing.

The Manatee River and Myakka River lie 30 minutes from Sarasota beaches.  Fly fishing Sarasota rivers gives anglers the chance to catch trophy snook on fly.  This occurs in a very interesting and relaxing setting.  Other species such as bass, redfish, jacks, gar and more are also available.  This happens in the cooler months, usually from mid October to early April.

“Oooh, I like the looks of that one!” I said as Ben opened up his fly box for me to inspect. I could tell by the look on his face that he did not share my enthusiasm. It was a white and olive Clouser pattern with a lot of gold flash. Gold is always a good choice when fly fishing Sarasota rivers in the tannin-stained water.

“Let’s just give it a half hour or so, and we can change it if it is not producing”.

Ben’s opinion of the fly changed shortly as he fooled a feisty little snook in just a few casts and over the next hour landed several more to 27”.  The Myakka River holds a lot of snook in the cooler months and it a fairly reliable fishery for anglers taking out a river fishing charter.

fly fishing Sarasota rivers

The Myakka River flows through Sarasota County 10 miles east of Sarasota and Venice, an hour south of Tampa on the west coast of Florida. It eventually flows south and along with the Peace River.  They create a renowned saltwater fishery; Charlotte Harbor. In the summer the water is high and fast from all of the rain, but in the cooler months it settles into a nice tidal river. As the water in the Harbor cools down, snook migrate up into the river to seek sanctuary in the warmer, deeper water. There is also a lot of food (bluegill, tilapia, mullet, fry, and crabs) for them to feed on.

Easy fly fishing, short casts

For the most part, this is fairly easy fly fishing. Short casts are the norm when fly fishing Sarasota rivers.  Managing the back cast is the primary challenge. An 8wt or 9wt outfit with an intermediate sink tip line is a good choice for the river. The leader is simple; just attach a 6’ section of 30 lb fluorocarbon and then tie on a fly. Fly selection is also pretty basic with Clouser patters in darker colors with some gold or rootbeer, along with a “firetiger” fly work well. Tie the fly on a #1 hook using large weighted eyes to get the fly down a few feet. Broad patterns such as Puglisi flies will also fool the wily snook, but are a bit harder to cast and will hang up more often.

fly fishing Sarasota rivers

Floating down the river with the current and casting towards likely fish-holding structure along the shoreline is the most productive technique. Shallow draft boats such as jon boats, canoes, and kayaks perform best, the water can get very shallow in spots. Make a cast, allow a few seconds to sink, then retrieve the fly back in using one foot strips. When a take occurs, use the “strip set” method to hook the fish. Pull sharply with the stripping hand and then raise the rod tip. Jerking the tip up as you might in trout fishing will result in fewer hook-ups.

As in all fishing, vary the retrieve until a productive pattern emerges. Again, this is pretty straight-forward fishing and it is mostly a matter of covering the water until a hungry fish is located. Though snook is the primary target, largemouth bass, juvenile tarpon, gar, jack crevalle, tilapia, and other species are frequently landed as well.

Fly fishing the Myakka River

The Myakka is one of two rivers designated a “Wild and scenic river” in the state of Florida. This means limited access and development resulting in a relaxed and serene experience. The entire river is also a “No-wake” zone. Fly fishing for snook on the Myakka is a unique experience that is a half hour drive from the resort town of Sarasota, but a world away in terms of environment.  Access to the Myakka River is limited, this is partly why it remains so remote feeling.  Snook Haven in Venice, Fl offers the bast spot to launch boats to fish the river.  It is also a cool little park with a restaurant.  Visitors can enjoy lunch after a morning fishing trip.  It is also a good place to rent canoes or launch a kayak.  Visiting anglers should give fly fishing Sarasota rivers a try!

fly fishing Sarasota rivers

Fly fishing the Manatee River

The Manatee River runs forty five minutes north east of Sarasota.  It begins at Lake Manatee and the river flows west from the dam.  Much of the river is very shallow and suited only from kayaks and canoes.  The stretch of the Manatee River from Rye Rd to Ft. Hamer is the most productive for fly fishing.  Anglers can access the river from a very nice ramp and park at Ft. Hamer.  Another more primitive ramp can be used at Ray’s Canoe Hideaway.  Ray’s offers canoe rentals along with bait for fishing.

The Manatee River offer anglers the chance to catch the most variety of species.  Snook, redfish, jack crevelle, juvenile tarpon, and ladyfish are saltwater species landed.  Freshwater species include largemouth bass, catfish, bream, gar, and sunshine bass.  The shorter length of the river, freshwater fish washing over the dam, and proximity to Tampa Bay all are factors for contributing to this unique fishery.

Fly fishing the Braden River

The Braden river is quite short and is a tributary of the Manatee River.  It is purely saltwater and offers anglers the opportunity to catch snook, redfish, and other species.  However, the highlight of the Braden River is the consistent fly fishing for large jack crevelle.  Jacks put up a tremendous battle on fly tackle!  They use their broad sides to pull very hard.  Often times, jacks can be seen  working on the surface.  Snook fishing can be very good, and redfish are caught with regularity.

The Braden River is more developed than the Manatee and Myakka.  It has a lot of houses and road noise can be heard.  The Braden River is also shorter, which can tend to concentrate fish in the deeper areas.  It is also the most convenient, being a short drive from Sarasota beaches.  There is a ramp with parking and facilities on SR 64 where it crosses the river.

fly fishing Sarasota rivers

Shallow water flats fishing

It sounds like a contradiction, but often times the largest fish are found in the shallowest of water. While the deeper grass flats hold schools of fish and is a better option for action and numbers. Fly anglers seeking a trophy will do well focusing on shallow grass flats, oyster bars, and mangrove shorelines. Redfish and jack crevelle school up in shallow water, the largest trout are loners and will set up in potholes in shallow flats, and snook will feed on bait in the skinny water as well.

This type of fishing has exploded in popularity in recent years. Flats and bay boats abound and kayak fishing is very popular. The result is that these fish receive a LOT of pressure, especially in the popular Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor areas. Fish in these shallow areas are spooky and require different tactics in order to be successful.

Tackle requirements are similar to other inshore fishing applications, a 7wt or 8wt outfit is fine. Floating lines are used as the water fished is seldom more that 3 feet deep.  Longer leaders with a 20lb bite tippet will increase the chances of fooling fish. But, the biggest change in tactics is the need for patience and stealth.

Fish in water this shallow are extremely spooky and the slightest noise or shadow can send them running for cover. The most popular fly patterns are Clouser Minnow, Lefty Deceiver, and Crystal MInnow patterns in white or bait fish colors.

Fly fishing tactics in Sarasota rivers

The approach when attacking a flat or shoreline is similar to that of the deep flats in that the wind and tide are factors that need to be taken into account. Whenever possible, choosing an area where the wind and tide will move the boat in the same direction. Obviously, a shallow draft boat will be required to access these areas. The classic situation is a flats skiff with the angler positioned on the bow and the guide or other angler poling the boat from the stern or poling platform.

Many anglers prefer the low, incoming tide when working the shallows. Fish will stage on the edges where the flat drops off, waiting for the water to come up. Fish will then get up on the flat, scatter out, and search for food. Along the same lines, fish will gang up in “potholes”. These are depressions in the flats that can range in size from a foot to to over 20 feet and larger. In both instances, the low water concentrates the fish, making them easier to locate. The more water that there is on a flat the more places the fish can be.

Tide strength and heights are crucial elements when fly fishing in the shallows. Anglers need to study the tide charts, it is much more complex than just the times of the high and low tides. The tide height and speed at which it is moving are very important to know so that anglers can understand fish movements. Wind is also a factor; a northeast wind will empty a flat of water while a south wind will flood it.

Drifting and sight casting

Anglers can choose to either blind cast likely looking areas or sight cast to specific fish or small bunches of fish. As the boat eases down the shoreline or across the flat, the fly is cast towards the shoreline or potholes and grass edges.  The fly is allowed to sink a moment, and retrieved back in. Unlike the deep grass flats, the fish will normally be found in small areas and bunched up. It will take time, effort, and patience to eliminate unproductive water.

Blind casting will normally produce more fish, but sight casting is very exciting! This is exactly what it sounds like, an angler either readies on the bow while boat fishing or stealthily wades a flat, visually searching for fish. Once sighted, the fly is cast out, taking into account the position of the fish and direction it is moving, and hopefully a take ensues.

It can be a bit overwhelming at first, but there are some things that anglers should key on to help locate fish. Edges are always worth investigating, whether it is a weed bad, oyster bar, or drop off. Current edges can also be used as ambush points by predators. Mangrove shorelines are very enticing, but there are miles and miles of them and fish will only be in short sections.

Searching out spots

The key is to find something different such as cuts, oyster bars, and especially holes and deeper water, fish will definitely hold there. Also, anglers will want to see signs of life; there is nothing worse than a “dead” flat. Areas that show glass minnows and other baitfish, mullet schools, birds, are promising.  The best of all flats with fish tailing, waking, or working bait are prime spots.

Anglers that are serious about mastering this technique will need to put in their time. Choosing a small area and learning it well is a good investment and will serve the angler well. It is amazing how different these types of spots are with just a little change in tide height. Learning the tides, bottom, and local fish migrations in one small area will help them catch fish in other locations.

Wading can be an extremely effective strategy when targeting fish in shallow water, especially once a productive area is located. Some experienced guides will pole an area and not even fish, just look for signs and fish. Once a likely area is identified, they get out of the boat and walk. With the pressure that fish get these days, being able to eliminate boat noises. This will allow fly casters to get much closer to their quarry and have more time to react.

Kayaks have become popular are are great tools to use to fish shallow flats. They give anglers access to waters that power boats can’t launch. Kayaks float very shallow and are virtually silent. Anglers can fish from the kayak or use it to get to productive areas where they can get out and wade. They are low-maintenance and effective platforms from which to fish.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236

 

Best Sarasota fishing charter

Best Sarasota fishing charter is Adventure Charters!

The best Sarasota fishing charter is Adventure Charters with Capt. Jim Klopfer. Capt. Jim has been guiding in Sarasota full time since 1991. Diversity is what makes Capt. Jim different from all the other fine guides in Sarasota. He will employ multiple tactics using both artificial lures and live bait on a single four hour fishing charter.

best Sarasota fishing charter

Sarasota offers visiting anglers many different species to target and catch and several different techniques with which to do so. This is advantageous as it allows Capt. Jim to tailor the fishing charter to the experience skill level and expectations of the client. Depending on the season, most fishing charters produce 6 to 8 different species. Speckled trout, snook, redfish, Spanish mackerel, blue fish, jack crevelle, flounder, sea bass, grouper, snapper, sheepshead, flounder, black drum, false albacore, sharks, ladyfish, cobia, and even giant tarpon are available throughout the season.

View current fishing report HERE

Capt Jim has been a fishing guide in Sarasota, Florida since 1991. Anglers who are interested in purchasing the equipment that he uses and writes about in his articles can do so HERE on the PRODUCTS page.

Tackle used on the best Sarasota fishing charter is very similar to what freshwater anglers are comfortable with up north. A 6 1/2 foot spinning outfit spooled with 10 pound line is used on most charters. Heavier tackle is used when targeting large fish such as snook or when fishing around docks and bridges. Capt. Jim can provide conventional tackle for those anglers who prefer that. Fly fisherman are certainly welcome, Capt. Jim provides Orvis tackle for his clients. A seven wt to 9 wt weight outfit with an intermediate sink tip line is a great all round choice.

light tackle bottom fishing tips

Fishing charters in Sarasota

The majority of charters are run on the deep grass flats in Sarasota Bay. The Bay is blessed with large expanses of submerged vegetation and water ranging from ankle-deep to 10 foot. The best action comes on the flats that are between 5 feet and 10 feet deep. This is where the most variety of species will be encountered. Anglers will cast lures or live bait as the boat drifts across the flat.

Both Big Sarasota Pass and New Pass are inlets that connect Sarasota Bay with the Gulf of Mexico. Both can be very productive depending on the conditions. Spring and fall are prime times to fish the passes. Pompano, bluefish, mackerel, and ladyfish are commonly caught in the passes. Structure such as docks, bridges, seawalls, and rocks provide prime habitat for several different species. Sheepshead, grouper, snapper, flounder, and snook are all caught around such structure in the passes at one time of year or another.

best Sarasota fishing charter

Fishing can be fantastic in the Gulf of Mexico, just off the Sarasota beaches.  Spanish mackerel, false albacore, and other species move in to feed on the huge schools of bait fish.  A couple days of east wind will result in calm seas and clear water.  This brings the bait in which in turn attracts the predator fish.  Sharks, king mackerel, cobia, and even tarpon are also landed.  This truly is world class fishing!

Anglers seeking a bit more challenge may opt to target snook, redfish, and jacks. These fish are seldom caught by accident. Mangrove shorelines, oyster bars, docks, and potholes in grass flats throughout the area are prime locations for these game fish. Artificial lures such as plugs, jigs, and spoons are most often used. This type of fishing won’t produce the numbers of fish that the deep grass flats will, but it will produce some real trophies!

Sarasota fishing report

Sarasota Florida fishing charters

Many anglers going out on Sarasota fishing charters have a specific species that they would like to target.  This is especially true of the “glamour” species.  Snook, redfish, and tarpon are examples.  Below is a list of the most popular fish species available to anglers fishing in Sarasota.

Species caught on the best Sarasota fishing charter.  Check HERE for local regulations.

Snook

best Sarasota fishing charter

Snook are the premier inshore game fish in Florida, and are very much sought after by anglers in Sarasota. Snook can be caught in a variety of locations using multiple techniques. Snook are really a lot like largemouth bass; they are ambush predators with a large mouth that can inhale prey easily. They have a big broad powerful tale for quick movements in tight quarters. They feed on just about everything that swims and can be taken on live bait along with a wide variety of artificial lures.

Snook have a very distinct seasonal migration. In the winter, especially if it is cold and the water temperature in Sarasota Bay dips into the upper 50s. Snook will migrate up into creeks and residential canals as the water in these areas is darker deeper and normally significantly warmer than the exposed shallow flats.

Artificial lures are the best approach when targeting snook in these wintertime creeks and canals. Plugs and jigs with a soft plastic body allow anglers to cover a lot of water fairly quickly. It is important in this situation to eliminate unproductive water and lures give anglers the best opportunity to do that. Rapala X-Raps and Bass Assassin baits are proven lures for winter snook and jacks.

As it starts to warm up and spring, snook will move out of their winter haunts and into the backwaters of Sarasota Bay. They will take up residence in ambush spots to feed. These can be mangrove shorelines with cover and a little depth, oyster bars that drop off, holes in grass flats, along with man-made structure such as bridges and docks.

Sarasota fishing report

 

Current will position the fish where they can sit just out of the flow and ambush prey as it flows past. Generally speaking, outgoing tides are preferred, especially early and late in the day. Anglers fishing at night do well working the lighted docks and bridges with live shrimp and flies.

The most effective technique for catching snook in the warmer months is to catch a bunch of pilchards, (also known as white bait, shiners, greenbacks) and use them to chum the snook into range and into a feeding mood. This requires a cast net, the ability to toss it, in a boat with a large live well and good pump. But in most cases, it is worth the effort!

Anglers can read a comprehensive article on snook fishing here

By the time we get to late May, many of the snook will be out in the passes and down the beach in large numbers. This is a time and place that snook spawn. It is a great time to catch and release a trophy snook. Live bait generally works best in the deeper waters of the passes. The rocks in Big Pass and New Pass hold a lot of fish. Anglers can also sight cast to snook a long area beaches. This is great sport and can be done with fly or light spinning tackle. By late August the pattern begins to reverse itself, and the snook begin moving back into the base.

Redfish

best Sarasota fishing charter

Redfish are another popular inshore game fish in Sarasota. Redfish are caught using two distinctly different methods. They are sought after on the shallow, expansive flats, primarily in North Sarasota Bay and around docks and other structure in cooler months.

Redfish start to school up in mid-summer and the schools can be quite large. However, these fish can be extremely spooky in water that shallow. Also, angling pressure is high as this is a very popular way to target redfish. Low incoming tides are best as they will concentrate reds on the edges of flats. They will wait for the tide to come up scatter over the bar and feed.

guide to saltwater fishing

Fishing in very shallow water can be tricky, especially if grass is present. Presenting a lure or live bait effectively requires lures that are either weedless, floats on the surface, or runs very shallow. Weedless spoons are great baits and can be cast a long way, seldom hang up, and cover a lot of water. Plugs can also be effective; either shallow diving plugs in deeper water or top water plugs in very shallow water.

Live bait can be used on the flats as well, particularly a large live shrimp. Reds will stage in potholes. These are depressions in the flats that are a bit deeper than the surrounding grass. Shrimp can be hooked with no weight, a small split shot, or fished under a float.

Click this link to read more about fishing for redfish

Redfish are also targeted by anglers fishing with live shrimp under docks. This is really as simple as it sounds, though there are some nuances involved, as in all fishing. Anglers should anchor upwind and up tide a decent cast away from the dock to be finished. The best docks are usually in 4 feet to 10 feet of water. Live bait fish can also be used successfully.

Speckled trout

best Sarasota fishing charter

Spotted sea trout, known locally as speckled trout, are perhaps the most popular fish along the entire Gulf Coast. Abundant, available year-round, aggressive, and great eating, it is no wonder that they are such a desirable species! While trout are very good to eat it is very important to release the larger female fish these are breeders and crucial to the health of the fishery.

Trout school up in decent numbers on the deep grass flats throughout the area. Submerged grass beds and 4 feet to 10 feet of water will hold bait which in turn attracts the trout and other species. A time proven technique on the best Sarasota fishing charter is to use a shrimp under a popping cork while drifting the flat. This ring has accounted for many trout over the years.

Artificial lures also fool plenty of trout and are very easy to use. There is also no bait to purchase, catch, or keep alive. The most popular lure by far here in Sarasota is the jig and grub combination. A quarter ounce jig head with a 3 inch to 4 inch plastic trailer is deadly on a variety of species but speckled trout in particular. Bass Assassin 4 inch Sea Shad baits in glow, new penny, and red, are extremely effective.

Siesta Key fishing charters

Wind and tide are the major considerations when drifting the deep grass flats for speckled trout. As the boat drifts to call across the grass, anglers cast out lures and flies seeking a school of feeding fish. These are large areas and a little breeze helps to cover the water in a reasonable amount of time. Obviously, too much wind will make it difficult to finish. Generally speaking, 6 foot to 8 foot deep is the target depth. At times, Capt. Jim will anchor the boat on the edge of a grass flat and free line a live bait out.

Spanish mackerel

best Sarasota fishing charter

Spanish mackerel are a terrific and often overlooked game fish! They fight hard, make blistering runs, are aggressive, and taste great when eaten right away. They readily take live bait lures and flies. What more can an angler ask for?

Spanish mackerel show up in the spring when the water temperature hits the upper 60s in degrees. They will stay around until late fall when it gets cold. They are caught both inshore and in the Gulf of Mexico. Mackerel are often an unexpected surprise for anglers drifting the deep grass flats. Sometimes they can be seen feeding on the surface, but most of the time they will intercept the jig plug, shrimp, or bait fish intended for trout or other species.

Spanish mackerel can be targeted in the spring and the fall and both passes when they move in. Again, at times they will feed on the surface and that makes them easy to locate. Drifting with a shrimp works well, too. Trolling a #8 Rapala X-Rap in white or olive is a good way to search for schools of mackerel.

Read more about fishing for Spanish mackerel in this article

Anglers targeting Spanish mackerel will do well to fish the inshore Gulf of Mexico. In the spring and fall they will school up in huge numbers and can be seen working on the surface. Anglers can look for birds, feeding fish, and schools of bait. Casting lures and flies to feeding fish is very exciting! Trolling is another productive method in the Gulf of Mexico. It works well on days with a little chop or when the fish are not feeding on the surface.

Pompano

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Pompano are prized among both local and visiting anglers both for their tenacious fight and their incredible flavor on a dinner plate. They are caught in the passes, out on the beaches, and on the grass flats in Sarasota Bay. The best bet for anglers targeting pompano is to drift Big Sarasota Pass using a small pompano jig. This is a basic jig with a round head and a little dressing. Banana style jigs are also effective. Pompano have small mouth and feed on the bottom.

Pompano are caught by anglers casting jigs and live shrimp as they drift the grass flats as well. Sometimes pompano will be seen skipping on the surface as the boat idles by. This is a sure sign that there are more in the area.

Anglers fishing the surf will do well with jigs and shrimp, but the real pompano surf experts will use sand fleas. Sand fleas, also known as mole crabs, are great for pompano. Sand fleas are caught in the surf using special rakes and then hooked on a small number two or number four hook in a little bit of weight.

Mangrove snapper

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Mangrove snapper are another extremely popular species for both their battle and their table fare. Snapper are available all year round near structure such as docks, bridges, submerged rocks, and ledges. Live shrimp fished on the bottom with just enough weight to get down there is the best bet. Smaller hooks and light leaders are often required as snapper can be a bit spooky especially in clear water. The inshore artificial reefs off of Lido Key are great spots to bottom fish when it is calm in the Gulf of Mexico.

Mangrove snapper have been showing up on the grass flats over the last several years and good numbers with some very nice fish mixed in. July, August, and September have been the best months. Chumming with pilchards is the best technique to catch snapper on the grass. Handfuls of live or fresh dead bait is tossed out behind the boat on a deep patch of grass. This will get them excited and fired up behind the boat. Going small on the hook and light on the leader will result in more fish. Of course trout, mackerel, grouper, ladyfish, and other species will be caught as well.

Bluefish

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Bluefish are known to many anglers visiting Sarasota as they range up the entire East Coast of the country. They do not grow as large here, 5 pounds is a very nice bluefish, but since most are caught using light tackle they are great fun to catch. They need to be handled correctly and eaten fresh, but they are underrated as table fare. Like many species here, they are caught by anglers drifting the deep grass flats as well as the passes.

Jigs work very well for bluefish and when they cut you off, which they will, your only out a dollar or so. Plugs work very well but can get expensive and they are also tricky to release with a bunch of trouble hooks. Live bait works well and a long shank hook were reduced cutoffs.

Florida saltwater fishing in spring

Bluefish will be caught in the passes especially in the cooler months. Jigs bounced on the bottom along with spoons and live bait will work. Sometimes bluefish will be caught by surf anglers on the beach as well.

Sheepshead

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Sheepshead invade Sarasota each year around Christmas and stay around until late spring. These tasty members of the Porgy family are structure oriented and can be found near anything the provides cover and has barnacles. Bridges and docks are prime spots as our seawalls, ledges, submerged rocks, and artificial reefs. Sheepshead are rarely caught on lures, live or frozen bait is required. Shrimp, fiddler crabs, and sand fleas, will work live fresh dead or frozen.

Get more tips on sheepshead fishing here

Sheepshead are notorious for being great bait stealers. They bite very lightly and anglers need to be patient and be still an order to catch them. Small hooks rigged up on a short leader with a sliding sinker is the best rate. The sheepshead will be able to pick up the bait and move off without feeling any weight. Sheepshead are great eating but very difficult to clean. The inshore artificial reefs off of Lido Key are great spots to target sheepshead on nice days.

Jack crevalle

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Jack crevalle are a terrific game fish! Jacks are like bluegill on steroids, they turn their broadsides and just pull as hard as they can. Jacks school up and can be voracious at times, devouring anything that moves. They can also be fussy. Jacks are found throughout the area and just about every portion of Sarasota Bay.

In the cooler months jacks are found in backwaters, residential canals, creeks, and area rivers. Live shrimp will work, but fast-moving lures like plugs are more fun and elicit violence strikes. As it warms up, jacks move into the bays to feed. By summer they can be anywhere or nowhere. Anglers land them drifting the deep grass along with other species. The area south of Siesta Drive in Roberts Bay is a good area for jack crevalle. Docks seawalls, canals, and Phillippi Creek are prime spots that attract fish. Jacks will grow to 10 pounds.

Ladyfish

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Ladyfish have saved the day on many charters in Sarasota, despite the fact that they are sometimes disparaged by local anglers. While not good to eat, they are abundant aggressive, hit lures, baits, and flies, leap high out of the water, and fight very hard for their size. In the cooler months they school up in very large numbers and multiple hookups are the norm. They are caught in the passes out on the beach, and on the deep grass flats.

Ladyfish will certainly take live shrimp and pilchards, but they are much more fun to catch on lures. This is a great opportunity to teach kids to use jigs and other lures as a bites are frequent and easy to feel. A jig and grub combo is tough to be and color rarely matters. Fly anglers can have great fun with ladyfish as well. It is a great opportunity for the novice fly angler to get in some practice and build confidence. Ladyfish are excellent cut bait for sharks and other species.

Cobia

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Cobia are normally caught out in the Gulf of Mexico but they do move into Sarasota Bay. They are an incidental catch on the flats and passes and will hit the same lures and baits that produce all of the other inshore species. They are often seen just cruising under the surface and are mistaken for sharks. Prepare for a long battle on trout tackle. They are terrific eating but need to be 33 inches to the fork.

Flounder

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Flounder are a delicious bottom fish that are well known and prized by anglers everywhere. Most of the flounder in Sarasota are southern golf flounder. Though we really don’t have a population large enough to target they are caught occasionally by anglers fishing for other species. Structure such as docks and bridges along with deeper holes in the grass flats are good spots to try for flounder jigs, live bait, and cut bait all produce. Flounder do school up occasionally on the inshore artificial reefs.

Gag grouper

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Gag grouper are arguably the most popular and prized offshore species in Sarasota. Most of the grouper that are caught inshore are juveniles that will migrate out into the Gulf of Mexico, where they will grow to full maturity. Legal grouper are seldom caught in Sarasota Bay, though some anglers target them by trolling large plugs and bottom fishing with heavy tackle and large baits. Area bridges are the top spots for larger grouper. Anglers on a best Sarasota fishing charter may land grouper when Sheepshead fishing in the spring and on the deep grass flats in mid to late summer.

Sharks

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Small sharks are great fun to catch and always a crowd favorite, especially for the young anglers! Most are caught incidentally; they will hit jigs and live bait. In the late summer they can be targeted using cut ladyfish on the flats. They are usually plentiful in the inshore Gulf in the spring and again in the fall as they feed on schools of Spanish mackerel.

Tarpon

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Many anglers consider tarpon to be the ultimate fishing challenge. There are few opportunities to sight cast to fish well over 100 pounds using fairly light spinning tackle. Tarpon fishing is very specialized however, and not for everyone. It is much like deer hunting, there will be a lot of time spent looking and waiting. But, when it all comes together, there is nothing like it! Tarpon show up in schools off of the Sarasota Beaches in early May and stay until mid July. Most tarpon are caught using small live crabs or hand sized bait fish, however large plugs will fool tarpon as will a well-placed fly.

False albacore

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False albacore make a run along the Gulf Coast in the spring and again in the fall. They are following the large schools of bait fish upon which they feed. False albacore are caught off of the Sarasota Beaches up to 12 pounds. They put up a tremendous fight and a reel with the quality drag is required to catch them. Most are caught sight fishing as they feed actively on the surface. This adds to the excitement of targeting false albacore as the action can be fast and furious. Small lures such as spoons, plugs, and jigs are most often used, as the bait they are feeding on is quite small, usually glass minnows. This is a great opportunity for a fly angler to experience world-class action!

Sarasota river fishing charters

Capt. Jim offers visiting anglers a unique experience; fishing local area rivers. Adventure charters is the only operation offering such a trip. A smaller 14 foot Alumacraft John boat is used for these charters. Launching areas can be primitive and the water can be very shallow and spots thus the need for a light, shallow draft boat. The venerable John boat is perfect for this!

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The Myakka River, Braden River, and Manatee River, all lie a short drive from Sarasota and her beaches. All three are unique and have their pros and cons. The Braden River is the most developed, however offers very consistent fishing for large jack crevelle. Snook, redfish, and other species are caught on most charters. The Myakka River in Venice Florida, offers the best trophy snook fishing. The Myakka River is a wild and scenic river and also has a distinct feel to it. It is almost like being on a South American River! The Manatee River is a bit of a mixture of the two, with some development, but also some very nice stretches. The Manatee River also offers the most variety in terms of species.

River fishing charters are best suited for anglers with a bit more experience. They do not produce as much action as do the inshore bay fishing charters. However, for anglers seeking a bit more challenge, the reward can be a trophy snook of a lifetime! Snook to 40 inches and 20 pounds are not uncommon. It is important to cover as much water as possible, therefore we drift with the current and cast rapidly plugs and other lures to likely looking shoreline cover. Snook, largemouth bass, jack crevelle, redfish, snapper, juvenile tarpon, catfish, gar, and sunshine bass are all available depending on the conditions.

Frequently asked questions

Q:  What is the cost of a Sarasota fishing charter and what does it include?

A:  A four hour fishing charter for up to four anglers is $400.  That cost covers all bait, tackle, licenses, the boat, and capt Jim’s service and experience.  Spinning tackle is used on most charters as it is the best choice for our type of fishing.  Live shrimp and live bait fish are used along with artificial lures.  A cooler with ice is provided for clients to keep their drinks and snacks cold.  More information can be found HERE.

Q:  What do clients going out on a Sarasota fishing charter need to bring?

A:  Clients should bring along whatever they want to eat and drink, hats, sunglasses, and sun screen.  Guests should wear boat or tennis shoes with white soles.  Everything else for the fishing charter is provided.  Anglers may bring along their own tackle if desired, though quality Penn and Shimano tackle is provided.  Fly anglers can use Orvis tackle provided by Capt Jim or certainly provide their own outfits if they prefer.

Q:  Are clients on a Sarasota fishing charter allowed to keep fish to eat?

A:  Yes.  Anglers may keep a few quality fish that are good to eat, in season, and meet the legal size requirements.  Capt Jim will fillet the fish and bag them up at the end of the charter.  Capt Jim does promote catch and release to insure the health of the fishery.  The fishing charter is about having fun and making memories, so keeping fish is a bonus and not the focus of the trip.

Q:  What kind of fish do clients on a Sarasota fishing charter catch?

A:  Sarasota Bay is a diverse fishery, offering anglers the opportunity to catch many different species.  Speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, bluefish, pompano, ladyfish, sharks, and other species are caught on the grass flats.  Snook, redfish, and jack crevelle are caught by more experienced anglers along mangrove shore lines.  Structure in the passes as well as docks and bridges hold sheepshead, snapper, grouper, and flounder.  Current species identification and regulations can be found on the FWC site.

Q:  Where will clients meet Capt Jim and at what time?

A:  The time will be determined by the weather, conditions, and tides.  Most fishing charters are run in the morning as that is usually the most reliable fishing.  Afternoons can be better in the winter as it warms up later in the day.  Most charters will leave around 7:30 a.m.  Most charters will leave from Centennial Park in downtown Sarasota, Florida. That ramp is in a very good location for accessing the fishing grounds and eliminating the slow speed zones.

Q:  What is the best time of year to go out on a Sarasota fishing charter?

A:  Fishing is good all year long, depending on conditions.  Summer offers very reliable action, though it is an early bite.  Spring is good as long as the weather is nice, though boat traffic is the heaviest.  Fall is fantastic, great weather and no crowds.  Winter can be very good, but weather fronts are an issue.  Anglers can check out my monthly forecasts to help plan their trip.

Q:  Who offers the best Sarasota fishing charter?

A:  With respect to the other fine fishing guides in Sarasota, nobody works harder than Capt Jim Klopfer for his clients.  He is easy-going and personable, patient with children, and fun.  Capt Jim will use whatever baits and techniques needed to give clients the best chance for success.  He often fishes with several different lures and baits on a single four hour charter.

Capt Jim Klopfer

(941) 371-1390

captklopfer@comcast.net

1059 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, Fl 34236